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spraying shoes for fungi

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by peter mccloskey, Sep 20, 2011.


  1. Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    Did anyone see this in Dermquest.com press? I thought it was impossible to decontaminate a shoe-I hope the study is repeated with other fungi and yeasts-

    Terbafine spray effectively decontaminates shoes exposed to T. Rubrum

    Study findings show that a single application of terbafine 1% spray powder or solution successfully decontaminates shoe insoles colonized by Trichophyton rubrum, the dermatophyte responsible for the majority of athlete’s foot and fungal nail infections.
     
  2. blinda

    blinda MVP

    Interesting, if a tad expensive, method of decontamination. A cheaper fungistatic solution may work as well, although take longer, as it inhibits dermatophyte reproduction.

    For those that don`t know, Demquest is great resource. You do have to register to receive the bulletins and view articles, but registration is FREE for health professionals :cool:

    http://www.dermquest.com/index.html

    Here`s the wiley abstract;

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-3083.2011.04176.x/abstract

    Cheers,
    Bel
     
  3. blinda

    blinda MVP

    Sorry Peter, forgot to add this paper which you may find of interest. It mentions a study which demonstrated that fungi still remained viable in hosiery after laundering, which may be what you were thinking of ;

    View attachment concomitant-fungal-contamination(1).pdf

    Whilst clinical cure of tinea is possible through medication, IMO we should be addressing the high prevelance of re-contamination. Using anti-fungal sprays or powder in footwear will help to reduce the likelihood of re-infection, but not elimanate it.

    Cheers,
    Bel
     
  4. yvonnespod

    yvonnespod Member

    when I was at college we used formalin solution in a garbage bag with all footwear and stockings and socks for 24 hours any thoughts yvonne
     
  5. blinda

    blinda MVP

    Yep, that would do it. Good experiment within the constraints of college/uni.

    However, in practice, decontamination of footwear should (ideally) be carried out regularly to prevent re-infection. Patients may have difficulty in obtaining formalin. Moreover, should the pt experience an adverse reaction to the solution (formalin is a known irritant and suspected carcinogen) would you stand up to litigation?

    Just my thoughts,
    Bel
     
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