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The sound of ground reaction forces

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Feb 4, 2016.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    The Relationship Between Landing Sound, Vertical Ground Reaction Force and Kinematics of the Lower Limb During Drop Landings in Healthy Males
    Kevin Wernli et al
    Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, 2016 Volume:0 Issue:0 Pages:1?22 DOI: 10.2519/jospt.2016.6041
     
  2. efuller

    efuller MVP

    .

    A perfect example of the concept of impulse. To change the momentum of a falling body you can apply a smaller force for a longer time or a higher force for a shorter time. Impulse is the area under the force time curve.

    What is interesting is the psychological factor of people not wanting to be noisy when there is a quiet background. The impulse you use to land from a fall is a sub conscious CNS choice. It appears background noise is part of that choice. This has implications for studies looking at vertical impact force peaks. And maybe barefoot running.

    Eric
     
  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Running quietly reduces ground reaction force and vertical loading rate and alters foot strike technique
    Xuan Phan, Tiffany L. Grisbrook, Kevin Wernli, Sarah M. Stearne, Paul Davey & Leo Ng
    Sports Science 03 Sep 2016
     
  4. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  5. scotfoot

    scotfoot Active Member


    The Relationship Between Landing Sound, Vertical Ground Reaction Force and Kinematics of the Lower Limb During Drop Landings in Healthy Males
    Kevin Wernli et al

    Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, 2016 Volume:0 Issue:0 Pages:1?22 DOI: 10.2519/jospt.2016.6041
    Running quietly reduces ground reaction force and vertical loading rate and alters foot strike technique

    Xuan Phan, Tiffany L. Grisbrook, Kevin Wernli, Sarah M. Stearne, Paul Davey & Leo Ng
    Sports Science 03 Sep 2016


    Interesting abstracts . So what would happen if you rigged a solid state accelerometer to a sound producing source and set the system to emit sound when impact transients are created during heel strike .

    The accelerometer could be taped to the lower back area over the spine and the sound source could be a mobile phone located on the upper arm (I have seen people running with phones secured in this area so a suitable product probably exists ) .

    The phone could be set to emit any number of noises and the effects studied .

    Given the abstracts above I am fairly confident that if the phone was set to emit an embarrassing noise every time an impact transient was detected then the study subjects would quickly learn to run without such transients whether shod or unshod . This would be especially true if the subjects trained over time in a busy public area .

    Would the gait changes induced be a good thing . No idea

    Any thoughts ?

    Gerry
     
  6. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    The issues in the above and in the related thread of 'Run softly' to reduce ground reaction forces is that ground reaction forces are actually a problem and need to e reduced. I keep harping on about this, that the evidence linking ground reaction or impact related factors to injury is far from compelling.
    I have blogged about this several times:
    Impact Related Factors and Running Injury
    Just How Significant are Heel Impacts at Causing Injury When Running?
     
  7. scotfoot

    scotfoot Active Member

    I feel that the issues around ground reaction forces and injury are clouded by the shod/ unshod debate .
    If the system I have outlined above could be made to work then the relationship between gait ,ground reaction forces ,and injury rates could be studied away from the barefoot debate .

    Gerry
     
  8. scotfoot

    scotfoot Active Member

    Just came across this from Prof Irene Davis . All the bits required for "gait change to avoid embarrassing noises" would therefore appear to be there . Who wants to quack like a duck all the way round Central Park ? Would the gait changes produced be beneficial ? Again ,I have no idea .

    Gerry
    Conference Paper: Validation Of Using A Mobile Application And Ankle-worn Accelerometers To Calculate Stance Time Asymmetry: 2285 Board #3 June 2, 3

    Steve Jamison · Irene Davis
    Full-text available · Conference Paper · Jun 2016
    Download
     
  9. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Sound Intensity Feedback During Running Reduces Loading Rates and Impact Peak
    Jeremiah J. Tate, PT, PhD, Clare E. Milner, PhD
    J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 6 Jul 2017.
     
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