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The windlass in diabetes

Discussion in 'Diabetic Foot & Wound Management' started by admin, Dec 1, 2005.

  1. admin

    admin Administrator Staff Member


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    Abnormal foot function in diabetic patients: the altered onset of Windlass mechanism
    E. D'Ambrogi, C. Giacomozzi*, V. Macellari* and L. Uccioli
    Diabetic Medicine
    Volume 22 Issue 12 Page 1713 - December 2005
     
  2. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    I fail to see how the data supports the conclusion (I have ordered but not yet read the full paper).

    How does Increased thickness of Achilles tendon and plantar fascia, contribute to the occurrence of an early Windlass mechanism - from what I can read they measured tickness of the tissues and plantar loading times and forces --- they did not measure windlass timing!
     
  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Plantar fascia thickness is longitudinally associated with retinopathy and renal dysfunction: a prospective study from adolescence to adulthood.
    Benitez-Aguirre PZ, Craig ME, Jenkins AJ, Gallego PH, Cusumano J, Duffin AC, Hing S, Donaghue KC.
    J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2012 Mar 1;6(2):348-55.
     
  4. Rob Kidd

    Rob Kidd Well-Known Member

    Perhaps they should have read Kidd and Kidd from 1993 - or was it 94? While being simplistic, it was way ahead of its time. Rob
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Plantar fascia function in diabetes mellitus related foot deformity
    Gelber, Judith R.; Sinacore, David R.; Strube, Michael J.; Mueller, Michael J.; Bohnert, Kathryn L.; Snozek, Darrah R.; Johnson, Jeffrey E.; Hastings, Mary K.
    Combined Societies Mtg; American Physical Therapy Association; San Diego January 21-24. 2013
     
  6. Rob Kidd

    Rob Kidd Well-Known Member

    Hi Craig,
    Kidd and Kidd 1993, was a stroke of genius in its day, though the day has long gone. Perhaps the real story has never been told.......... I came in from work from Curtin one night,opened the fridge, took out a bottle of wine...... This is what I heard from over the room: "Put that back, right now, I have this idea in my head that wont go away". 13 hours later, we (that is she and me), left the word processor. By then it was too late for a glass, so I got showered, and went back to work. I wonder? How many of today's crowd realise how much was done with so little?
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Windlass Mechanism in Individuals With Diabetes Mellitus, Peripheral Neuropathy, and Low Medial Longitudinal Arch Height
    Judith R. Gelber, DPT, OCS; David R. Sinacore, PT, PhD; Michael J. Strube, PhD; Michael J. Mueller, PT, PhD; Jeffrey E. Johnson, MD; Fred W. Prior, PhD; Mary K. Hastings, DPT, MSCI
    Foot & Ankle International June 10, 2014
     
  8. Jo BB

    Jo BB Active Member

    The last 2 days I have been checking my DM T2 patients with muscle testing, toe grip strength [tgs] and the foot stool-edge weight bearing test [FEWBT] and even my low foot risk stratification DM T2 have failed both the tbs and FEWBT tests. Am I observing early PN -motor neuropathy? If so I should be using orthotic therapy and intrinsic muscle exercises to minimise foot deformity and improve foot function? The other thing of note is because I am more alert to this I am definitely seeing more fasiculations in my Dm T2 low risk foot patients.
     
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