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To patent or not to patent...

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by DrBob, Jul 14, 2014.

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  1. DrBob

    DrBob Active Member


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    A short while ago a post reported that an orthotic lab had applied for a patent that claimed priority on an algorithm that used findings from a number of clinical investigations to generate a prescription for an appropriate orthosis (something to that effect?). Some responses indicated a certain amount of dissatisfaction with that approach. I recently had a casual chat with a patent lawyer I met who thought that such approaches were not only desirable but essential if business (ie industry/money) was to be encouraged to support podiatry (like dentistry and medicine). I'm curious to know whether the responses were a minority opinion or do many podiatrists feel potentially " threatened" or restricted by patents?
    Kind regards,
    DB
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. What else would you expect a patent attorney (who makes his living on patents) to say?......"patents are undesirable and nonessential and are overutilized by medical professionals in their never-ending quest to gain fame and fortune for themselves at the expense of the intellectual growth of their profession..."?

    Do you really think patent attorneys are going to bite the hand that feeds them?! Not likely.
     
  4. RobinP

    RobinP Well-Known Member

    Better Call Saul.....see what he says ;)
     
  5. javier

    javier Senior Member

    I do not think so, and MIT's Professor Daron Acemoglu neither

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 22, 2016
  6. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Was just reading this unrelated post on SBM and read this:
     
  7. Which is exactly why I never tried to patent the medial heel skive....more patients were helped sooner by me not patenting it.
     
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