Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

Unusual lesion - help and advice sought!

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by Dolag, Jun 25, 2010.

  1. Dolag

    Dolag Welcome New Poster


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    Hi there,

    I am wondering if anyone can give me any advice on a very unusual lesion. My patient is a 45 year old very active lady who came to me 9 months ago with what looked like a neurovascular corn on the left 4th MPJ. After it was treated and given padding etc she returned a month later saying it felt loads better after it had been done but was starting to get very sore again. Since then the lesion has rapidly changed in appearance and the pain has increased so much that pt can barely walk. Like i said, it started off having the appearance of a neurovascular corn but now it is larger, has a very macerated centre and fibrous edges with black lines (not capillaries) running through it. At first i could achieve some very deep debridement but now i can barely touch it with a scalpel because of the pain which the pt says goes up to the tips of her toes and down to her heel. I sent skin scrapings to Virology to check for HPV at request of consultant who thought it might be a verruca but they dont do the test. I have given her every kind of padding under the sun and it makes no difference.
    Last week the pt had an MRI scan of her foot and she said that the pain in the lesion when she was having the MRI was the worst pain she had ever experienced - like a hot sharp knife going right into the lesion. She has also been to dermatology who told her it was just a corn.

    So.......any advice or thought etc would be greatly appreciated as i am just at a loss as to what to do next for her. She is seeing the consultant again next week for the results of her MRI.
    Incidentally, and it might not be related, the patient was on holiday in Vietnam and became extremely unwell when she came home - hospitalised for 2 weeks with what the docs described as something viral (ie, they didnt know what caused it) and its since then the lesion has rapidly become much worse.......possibly related??

    Many thanks in advance for any help
    D
     
  2. blinda

    blinda MVP

    Hi Dolag,

    :welcome: to the Arena! Don`t suppose you have a pic of the lesion? Always handy when seeking a derm opinion. I don`t like any lesion with `black lines`so you were wise to send for further investigation. Did either the virology or dermatology departments take a biopsy?

    Any other med history? Pain and burning sensation can be associated with herpes zoster. Only other viral condition I can think of is hand-foot-and-mouth disease.

    Keep us posted on the outcome.

    Cheers,
    Bel
     
Loading...

Share This Page