Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

Weight loss reduces musculoskeletal symptoms in the foot

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by Hylton Menz, Oct 23, 2006.

Tags:
  1. Hylton Menz

    Hylton Menz Guest


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    From the International Journal of Obesity :

    Int J Obes (Lond). 2006 Apr 25; [Epub ahead of print]

    Musculoskeletal findings in obese subjects before and after weight loss following bariatric surgery

    Hooper MM, Stellato TA, Hallowell PT, Seitz BA, Moskowitz RW.

    Objective:To determine the point prevalence of painful musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions in obese subjects before and after weight loss following bariatric surgery.Design:Longitudinal, interventional, unblended.Subjects:Forty-eight obese subjects (47 women, one man, mean age 44+/-9 years; mean body mass index (BMI) 51+/-8 kg/m(2)) recruited from an academic medical center bariatric surgery program.Measurements:Comorbid medical conditions; MSK findings; BMI; Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) for pain, stiffness and function; and SF-36((R)) for quality of life.Methods:Consecutive subjects were recruited from the University Hospitals of Cleveland Bariatric Surgery Program. Musculoskeletal signs and symptoms and non-MSK comorbid conditions were documented at baseline and at follow-up. Subjects completed the SF-36((R)) and the WOMAC questionnaires. Analyses were carried out for each MSK site, fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and for the cumulative effect on the spine, upper and lower extremities. The impact of change in comorbid medical conditions, BMI, physical and mental health domains of the SF-36((R)) on the WOMAC pain subscale score was evaluated. SF-36((R)) outcomes were compared to normal published controls.Results:Forty-eight subjects were available for baseline and a follow-up assessment 6-12 months after gastric bypass surgery. They lost an average of 41+/-15 kg and the mean BMI decreased from 51+/-8 to 36+/-7 kg/m(2). Baseline comorbid medical conditions were present in 96% before surgery and 23% after weight loss. There was an increased prevalence of painful MSK conditions at baseline compared to general population frequencies. Musculoskeletal complaints had been present in 100% of obese subjects before, and 23% after weight loss. The greatest improvements occurred in the cervical and lumbar spine, the foot and in FMS (decreased by 90, 83, 83 and 92%, respectively). Seventy-nine percent had upper extremity MSK conditions before and 40% after weight loss. Before surgery, 100% had lower extremity MSK conditions and only 37% did after weight loss. The WOMAC subscale and composite scores all improved significantly, as did the SF-36((R)). Change in BMI was the main factor impacting the WOMAC pain score.Conclusion:There was a higher frequency of multiple MSK complaints, including non-weight-bearing sites compared to historical controls, before surgery, which decreased significantly at most sites following weight loss and physical activity. These benefits may improve further, as weight loss may continue for up to 24 months. The benefits seen with weight loss indicate that prevention and treatment of obesity can improve MSK health and function.

    International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 25 April 2006; doi:10.1038/sj.ijo.0803349.
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effects of Weight Loss on Foot Structure and Function in Obese Adults: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial
    Jinsup Song, Reagan Kane, Dana N. Tango, Stephanie S. Vander Veur, James Furmato, Eugene Komaroff, Gary D. Foster
    Gait & Posture; Articles in Press
     
  4. When people I know well ask me how my podiatry practice is going, my standard response is:

    "As long as there is obesity and gravity, my business will be doing great!":cool:
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Changes in lower extremity muscle mass and muscle strength after weight loss in obese men: A prospective study
    Bokun Kim, Takehiko Tsujimoto, Rina So, Kiyoji Tanaka
    ORCP; Article in Press
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Baropodometric analyses of patients before and after bariatric surgery.
    Bacha IL
    Clinics (Sao Paulo). 2015 Nov;70(11):743-7. doi: 10.6061/clinics/2015(11)05.
     
Loading...

Share This Page