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Working in Canada

Discussion in 'Canada' started by moosepod, Jun 20, 2007.

  1. moosepod

    moosepod Member


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    I understand that once I have gained my BSc Podiatry in the UK I can apply to work in some states of Canada.

    Are there any conversion courses or postgraduate opportunities that would allow me to work in British Columbia or Alberta?

    Also where can I find out information on Salaries in New Brunswick and Ontario?

    Any help is appreciated
    Thank you.
     
  2. admin

    admin Administrator Staff Member

  3. random

    random Welcome New Poster

    One has to have a U.S. DPM to work in B.C. or Alberta....but then the foot care nurses are taking over anyway since the fees have been dropped by health insurance...No a rosey place to come.
     
  4. random

    random Welcome New Poster

    No transfer. Two Scottish trained practitioners came to B.C. but had to go back for two years at the Philadelphia college before they received a DPM degree.
     
  5. moosepod

    moosepod Member

    Thanks for your help.
     
  6. simonf

    simonf Active Member

    I think you would be able to work in manitoba and possibly saskatchewan
     
  7. moosepod

    moosepod Member

    I have had some information from some of the Canadian Societies, the general consensus is that International Applicants holding a BSc (Hons)in podiatry is able to work anywhere but Alberta and British Columbia, unless they complete the 4 or 5 years training in the U.S. to gain the D.PodM.

    So not all doom and gloom.
     
  8. Bellmont

    Bellmont Member

    UK Trained Podiatrists are to work in Manitoba, after applying for admission to the College of Podiatrists of Manitoba.

    We currently have a vacancy for a Poidiatrist in Brandon Manitoba.

    CV to podiatry@mts.net

    Rob Bellmont
     
  9. Mart

    Mart Well-Known Member

    I have spent a considerable part of my career in Canada actively participating in changing our provincial legislation.

    For those interested, here my personal synopsis of podiatry’s interests in Canada for those thinking of working here:

    Health care is a provincial jurisdiction, since Canada’s federal laws delegate regulation of health professions to individual provinces, there is regional variation in this legislation which currently somewhat inconsistent.

    There is no nationally recognized education standard for Canada for podiatry.

    There is no nationally recognized training program for podiatry.

    Differences of opinion appear to exist between some provincial professional organizations representing podiatrist’s interests regarding the level of competence in the various levels of practice according to training.

    The Federal government identified a while ago, that it’s goal of facilitating interprovincial employment mobility for professional s was not being met in many cases, this included podiatry.

    Currently there is a federally funded study being conducted which aims to compare, objectively, by a 3rd party analyst with no political axe to grind, the level of training and scope of practice of those with US DPM, UK BSc Podiatry , and I believe Canadian trained Chiropody diploma education.

    Once this study is completed the various bodies that regulate our profession will hopefully get their heads together and see what this information amounts to. Optimistically, this may in the long term rid us of the often divisive and unhealthy atmosphere which can permeate this kind of discussion.

    Unfortunately much of the commentary made by people with political rather than rational opinions regarding their and others training is based on ignorance and self interest. No comparative study of global podiatry education this has been done before to my knowledge, so how can we make unequivocal statements currently?


    As far as “foot-care a nurses taking over” is concerned, taking over what exactly, cutting toenails and palliative footcare? This view seems to epitomize the view of podiatrist professional financial self interest. What kind of health service administrator, doing their job well, is going to agree to pay podiatrists for trimming toenails, trimming calluses and doing basic wound care when someone with nursing training can do these tasks, just as well and safely for less cost. It is common sense with a burgeoning elderly population to make sure that health care funds, be they private or public are spent wisely. If podiatrists want to be paid for doing these tasks it would seem reasonable that the fees billed would reflect the level of expertise required to do them. I cannot imagine this would be a problem for the funding agency or why podiatrists want to be doing this anyway.

    cheers

    Martin


    The St. James Foot Clinic
    1749 Portage Ave.
    Winnipeg
    Manitoba
    R3J 0E6
    phone [204] 837 FOOT (3668)
    fax [204] 774 9918
    www.winnipegfootclinic.com
     
  10. moosepod

    moosepod Member

    Regarding wages? How does the wage in canada fair against a UK Podiatrist?
     
  11. greatwhite

    greatwhite Active Member

    Hi, I have noticed adverts for positions in Manitoba (Bellmont, this may have been a position you advertised as this was located in Brandon) and occasionally Saskatchewan in 'Podiatry Now' magazine and have always been very tempted to apply.

    What is the process like for a UK applicant? Do we have to organise visas/paperwork to be able to actually work there/fees etc or is this normally taken care of by the employer etc?

    How long does the process take? Any information much appreciated.
     
  12. Mart

    Mart Well-Known Member

    This is difficult to answer. In Manitoba for example, podiatrists are self employed and are paid fee for service - reneumeration will depend on what you do, how fast you do it, how much demand there is and how referal networks and individuals percieve is the value of what you do, in short, it is primarily dictated by free market, restrictions negotiated by insurance companies, and podiatrists own practice prerfences.

    cheers

    Martin

    The St. James Foot Clinic
    1749 Portage Ave.
    Winnipeg
    Manitoba
    R3J 0E6
    phone [204] 837 FOOT (3668)
    fax [204] 774 9918

    www.winnipegfootclinic.com
     
  13. Mart

    Mart Well-Known Member

    2 useful links are

    http://www.mts.net/~copom/

    http://www.podiatrycanada.org/

    hope this helps


    cheers

    Martin


    The St. James Foot Clinic
    1749 Portage Ave.
    Winnipeg
    Manitoba
    R3J 0E6
    phone [204] 837 FOOT (3668)
    fax [204] 774 9918
    www.winnipegfootclinic.com
     
  14. greatwhite

    greatwhite Active Member

    Hi, thanks for the links. They were useful, although some parts of the websites are under construction or being revised and have no content. If anyone has gone through this process previously or know how long it takes I would be very interested to hear from them.
     
  15. moosepod

    moosepod Member

    Thank you, that is a great help.

    Where can you suggest looking for vacant positions within Canada?
     
  16. Mart

    Mart Well-Known Member

    Difficult to answer because:

    To obtain immigration status the immigration dept needs evidence that a suitable Canadian citizen is unavailable to the work. It may be also possible to get entrepreneurial status if you have enough net worth. Typically in Manitoba, immigration occurs to fill vacancies in the various private clinics which are fairly rare (population of Manitoba is small - approx 1 million). Because until the past few years, there has not been a nationally recognized program operated by a Canadian University there tends to be a shortage of available Canadian Grads, most go to US or UK to train. Finally we now have a DPM program operating in Quebec and grads from that program should be entering the workplace soon, though I suspect most will be Francophone and likely to stay in Quebec.

    Keep any eye out on the pod Arena, definitely a good place to look. If you are really keen, be pro active and send resumes to as many clinics as the postman can deliver to.

    Be careful regarding any offers you might receive, I like many others had a pretty dodgy experience when I first came here and wish that I had had an opportunity to talk to a trusted 3rd party before I arrived.

    Good luck . . . . . . . Canada is a great County (the greatest) to live in. Professionally it suffers many of the same problems that I have seen elsewhere, but it is like most things, largely what you make it and there is plenty of opportunity here for those who care to push themselves a little.


    Cheers

    Martin

    The St. James Foot Clinic
    1749 Portage Ave.
    Winnipeg
    Manitoba
    R3J 0E6
    Phone [204] 837 FOOT (3668)
    Fax [204] 774 9918
    www.winnipegfootclinic.com
     
  17. moosepod

    moosepod Member

    Thank you again!

    It is great to be able to talk to someone who has gone through the experience.
     
  18. greatwhite

    greatwhite Active Member

    Hi Mart, good to hear of your experiences. What was 'dodgy' about your first post? How long did it take for you to get your first placement and did you have to complete the paperwork yourself before even applying for positions?
     
  19. Mart

    Mart Well-Known Member

    I paid for a share of a practice which turned out to be worthless with a practitioner who turned out to be podiatrically clueless. Relatively young, naïve, with a young family and no business sense I made a bad decision because I did not have enough experience or advise to do better. Things of course turned out OK, I wish the Internet had been around 20 years ago, I think I could have been better prepared, it is much easier to do your home work now days!

    Immigration wise things have likely changed since I arrived. My understanding is that you still need to present a job offer which has met the immigration requirements with other supporting documentaion to the Canadian Consulate from which ever country you are applying from. First step is find a job. Contact the Canadian High Commission to verify what this amounts to.

    If you are looking for an offer contact Rob Belmont in Brandon, I think they are still looking for someone, I have known the person who started that clinic for a long while and would consider him a fair and reasonable person to deal with.


    Good luck


    Cheers

    Martin

    The St. James Foot Clinic
    1749 Portage Ave.
    Winnipeg
    Manitoba
    R3J 0E6
    Phone [204] 837 FOOT (3668)
    Fax [204] 774 9918
    www.winnipegfootclinic.com
     
  20. simonf

    simonf Active Member

    firstly you need to get a job offer, this needs to be validated by the canadian government in as much as they need to issue a letter to say that a canadian doesnt want or cannot do the job. This is something the employer would sort out but it will typically take 8 weeks to process. At some point you would also have to apply for a licence to practice in whatever province, this will take a number of weeks depending on where you are heading. you will need some info from your local police dept to indicate you havent got a record for the licencing and also work permit - this takes 6 weeks to obtainOnce you have a valid job offer you can apply to canadian high commission in london, this will take about 6-10 weeks depending on how quick you can get your medical done. and then you are in a position to start your job. However, a work permit will only be granted for a max of 3 years, mostly they are for a year. If you want to stay longer you will need to apply for permanent residiency, this can take a while but apparently its quicker if you have a job already, esp if already in Canada.

    You should have a look at the website for canadian high commission in london (google is your friend!). It is almost impossible to speak to anyone in London office, but the web site has a good deal of info.

    hth
    s
     
  21. Dieter Fellner

    Dieter Fellner Well-Known Member

    Interesting the Scottish Podiatrists secured advanced standing with Phili college. I am very interested to have more details about this. Was this relatively recently ?

    Anyone know who the Podiatrists are and have contact details?

    Thanks !
     
  22. simonf

    simonf Active Member

    I am not sure that this was a recent event, I have not heard of any short cuts available to UK pods (even surgeons) in the US schools.

    s
     
  23. Smilingtoes

    Smilingtoes Active Member

     
  24. simonf

    simonf Active Member

    The Federal Labour mobility study is still ongoing, There is a nominal end date for this next year. Although it is likely to solve some issues for Canadian Pods being able to move from one province to another, I am not sure if it actually going to answer any issues about world wide podiatric education.

    s
     
  25. Smilingtoes

    Smilingtoes Active Member

    cheers
     
  26. hylapod

    hylapod Welcome New Poster

    This still applies through Temple University in the States.
     
  27. moosepod

    moosepod Member

    Hello,

    Thanks for all your help and advice so far. I'm just wondering, whether from a UK qualified pod now working in Canada or vice versa, is the world of working in east canada in podiatry like the UK or very different?
     
  28. moosepod

    moosepod Member

    Does the UK surgical qualification hold any weight in canada?
     
  29. simonf

    simonf Active Member

    Its difficult to tell at the moment, traditionally BC, AB and to some degree ONT have taken the DPM model of education as standard (in Ont only for pod surg).

    MB is looking to develop surgical practice, and is this may be inclusive to UK surgical training, but this is in early stages of development and may take some time to come to fruition.
     
  30. moosepod

    moosepod Member

    Hi Simon,

    Thanks for your help. I am seriously considering a move to Canada, just want to check the scope of practice and how it compares to the UK.

    I have relatives already in British Columbia, I know I can't work there, but East Canada sounds a nice place to live and work too.

    Moosepod
     
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