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Musculoskeletal problems in lipomyelomeningocele

Discussion in 'Pediatrics' started by NewsBot, Jan 18, 2014.

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  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    The spectrum of musculoskeletal problems in lipomyelomeningocele.
    Segal LS, Czoch W, Hennrikus WL, Wade Shrader M, Kanev PM.
    J Child Orthop. 2013 Dec;7(6):513-9.
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

    Neural tube defect

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are a group of birth defects in which an opening in the spine or cranium remains from early in human development. In the third week of pregnancy called gastrulation, specialized cells on the dorsal side of the embryo begin to change shape and form the neural tube. When the neural tube does not close completely, an NTD develops.

    Specific types include: spina bifida which affects the spine, anencephaly which results in little to no brain, encephalocele which affects the skull, and iniencephaly which results in severe neck problems.[1]

    NTDs are one of the most common birth defects, affecting over 300,000 births each year worldwide.[2] For example, spina bifida affects approximately 1,500 births annually in the United States, or about 3.5 in every 10,000 (0.035% of US births),[1][3] which has decreased from around 5 per 10,000 (0.05% of US births) since folate fortification of grain products was started.[3] The number of deaths in the US each year due to neural tube defects also declined from 1,200 before folate fortification was started to 840.[4]

    1. ^ a b "Neural Tube Defects (NTDs): Condition Information". National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, U.S. National Institutes of Health. 2017. Retrieved 30 November 2017.
    2. ^ National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (2012). "Neural Tube Defects (Annual Report)" (PDF). US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
    3. ^ a b "Spina Bifida - Data and Statistics". National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 12 October 2016. Retrieved 29 November 2017.
    4. ^ National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. "Folic Acid – Birth Defects Count". US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 13 May 2014.
     
  3. HansMassage

    HansMassage Active Member

    So! Breaking the word down it must refer to fat intrusion into myelin and meninges causing dural tube disfunction.
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Recurrent heel ulcers with calcaneal osteomyelitis in myelomeningocele: Treatment by partial calcanectomy and posterior transfer of tibialis anterior tendon
    Abdelhakim E Marei et al
    Foot Ankle Surg. 2022 Sep 14
     
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