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Determination of the amount of leg length inequality that alters spinal posture

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Mar 13, 2013.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Determination of the amount of leg length inequality that alters spinal posture in healthy subjects using rasterstereography.
    Betsch M, Rapp W, Przibylla A, Jungbluth P, Hakimi M, Schneppendahl J, Thelen S, Wild M.
    Eur Spine J. 2013 Mar 13.
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. drsha

    drsha Banned

    IMHO, this paper is moot because it is not longitudinal.

    Wolffs and Davis's Laws must be allowed to have impact over time on the entire posture including the spine.

    The fact that there is no immediate change with lifts < 20mm's shows a lack of understanding of the dynamics of bioarchitecture.

    In bioarchitecture, first there is a positional change (the lifts) which impacts posture. Then there is the functional adaptation of bone and soft tissue to produce an actual postural change.

    Put the lifts onto a foot bed and bring the patients back in 6-9 months and I predict there will be postural changes in the feet up to the spine, different for N=1, to accompany the positional changes for lifts much smaller than 20mm's.

    I would enjoy hearing a reaction form the members but mostly I would hope one or more of the authors will comment.
    Dennis
     
  4. If anyone has access, I'd much like to read this in its entirety.
     
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