Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

Early Signs of Motor Neuron Disease

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by NewsBot, Jul 1, 2022.

Tags:
  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    Identifying key signs of motor neurone disease in primary care: a nested case-control study using the QResearch database
    Xue W Mei et al
    BMJ Open. 2022 Jun 28;12(6):e058383
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

    Motor neuron disease

    Motor neuron diseases or motor neurone diseases (MNDs) are a group of rare neurodegenerative disorders that selectively affect motor neurons, the cells which control voluntary muscles of the body.[1][2] They include amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS),[3][4] progressive bulbar palsy (PBP), pseudobulbar palsy, progressive muscular atrophy (PMA), primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and monomelic amyotrophy (MMA), as well as some rarer variants resembling ALS.

    Motor neuron diseases affect both children and adults.[5] While each motor neuron disease affects patients differently, they all cause movement-related symptoms, mainly muscle weakness.[6] Most of these diseases seem to occur randomly without known causes, but some forms are inherited.[2] Studies into these inherited forms have led to discoveries of various genes (e.g. SOD1) that are thought to be important in understanding how the disease occurs.[7]

    Symptoms of motor neuron diseases can be first seen at birth or can come on slowly later in life. Most of these diseases worsen over time; while some, such as ALS, shorten one's life expectancy, others do not.[2] Currently, there are no approved treatments for the majority of motor neuron disorders, and care is mostly symptomatic.[2]

    1. ^ Cite error: The named reference El2008 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
    2. ^ a b c d "Motor Neuron Diseases Fact Sheet: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)". www.ninds.nih.gov. Archived from the original on 13 April 2014. Retrieved 7 November 2010.
    3. ^ "Motor neurone disease – NHS". nhs.uk. 15 January 2018. Retrieved 24 October 2020.
    4. ^ Healthdirect Australia (17 April 2020). "Motor neurone disease (MND)". www.healthdirect.gov.au. Retrieved 24 October 2020.
    5. ^ Cite error: The named reference :14 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
    6. ^ Cite error: The named reference :7 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
    7. ^ Cooper-Knock J, Jenkins T, Shaw PJ (1 September 2013). Clinical and molecular aspects of motor neuron disease. San Rafael, California (1537 Fourth Street, San Rafael, CA 94901 USA). ISBN 9781615044290. OCLC 860981760.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: location (link)
     
Loading...

Share This Page