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Foot function and low back pain

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Sep 29, 2007.

  1. Peter1234

    Peter1234 Active Member

    Hi Robert,

    thanks for the post. Does this mean that you will not treat LBP patients with orthotics, even if you see a 'disordered' foot function in gait?
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Loading of the lower extremity and low back when using wedge orthotics during
    walking and stair negotiation

    Tami Janssen
    Master of Science Thesis; Iowa State University; 2013
     
  3. Dananberg

    Dananberg Active Member

    Alex,

    Sorry for the delay in responding. Just saw your post.

    Sagittal rotation of the hip joint (extension) during CLOSED KINETIC CHAIN activity such as walking requires that the heel lift off the support surface by pivoting over the metatarsal heads as the MTPJ's dorsiflex. When Functional hallux limitus is present, dorsiflexion is either limited, absent or delayed. Therefore, the timing of EFFICIENT heel lift is either limited, absent or delayed. How could the hip joint possibly extend if the heel did not lift from the ground? Therein lies your answer.

    Howard
     
  4. Dananberg

    Dananberg Active Member

    Alex,

    Sorry for the delay in responding. Just saw your post.

    The key to understanding Functional hallux limitus and its effect on hip extension is its relationship to CLOSED KINETIC CHAIN FUNCTION.

    Weight bearing makes the difference. In every muscle function study I have seen, extensors of the hip are OFF during hip extension. They work during hip flexion as a method of support (control). Therefore, hip extension during gait would appear to be non-muscular. As the swing limb kicks forward, the CoM is pulled forward. The trailing limb extends by virtue of 1) its ball and socket design and 2) the ability of the foot to act as a distal pivot, and permit the body to advance over it. As the heel raises from the ground while pivoting over the forefoot, hip extension is permitted. If Functional hallux limitus is present, then this scenario is blocked. It results in limited hip extension and accommodative flexion of the LS spine.

    Hope this helps.
    Howard
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Foot Posture, Leg Length Discrepancy and Low Back Pain - their relationship and clinical management using foot orthoses - An overview
    Julie C. Kendall, Adam R. Bird, Michael F. Azari
    The Foot ; Available online 19 March 2014
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effect of Foot Hyperpronation on Lumbar Lordosis and Thoracic Kyphosis in Standing Position Using 3-Dimensional Ultrasound-Based Motion Analysis System.
    Farokhmanesh K, Shirzadian T1, Mahboubi M, Shahri MN.
    Glob J Health Sci. 2014 Jun 17;6(5):36779. doi: 10.5539/gjhs.v6n5p254.
     
  7. Peter1234

    Peter1234 Active Member

    Hi
    Does anyone have the full text version?
     
  8. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Increased unilateral foot pronation affects lower limbs and pelvic biomechanics during walking
    Renan A. Resende, Kevin J. Deluzio, Renata N. Kirkwood, Elizabeth A. Hassan, Sérgio T. Fonseca
    Gait & Posture; Articles in Press
     
  9. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The Relationship Between Foot and Pelvic Alignment
    While Standing

    Sam Khamis, Gali Dar, Chava Peretz, Ziva Yizhar
    Journal of Human Kinetics volume 46/2015, 85-97
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Comparative Analysis of Lower Limb
    Alignments in Healthy Subjects and Subjects
    with Back Pain

    Ramin Balouchy
    Annals of Applied Sport Science, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 33-42, Summer 2015
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Comparison of selected muscular activity of trunk and lower extremities in young women's walking on supinated, pronated and normal foot
    Hamideh Khodaveisi, Haydar Sadeghi, Raghad Memar, Mehrdad Anbarian
    Apunts. Medicina de l'Esport; 7 January 2016
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Gait ground reaction force characteristics of low back pain patients with pronated foot and able-bodied individuals with and without foot pronation
    Nader Farahpour et al
    Jnl Biomech; Article in Press
     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Correlation between Flexible Flat Foot and Lumbar Lordotic Angle
    FATEMA SDEEK et al
    Med. J. Cairo Univ., Vol. 84, No. 1, June: 567-572, 2016
     
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Comparison of active calf muscle stretching versus ankle mobilisation
    on low back pain and lumbar flexibility in pronated foot subjects

    K. Vadivelan et al
    Int J Community Med Public Health. 2017 Jun;4(6):xxx-xxx
     
  15. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The effect of foot hyperpronation on spine alignment in standing position.
    Ghasemi MS et al
    Med J Islam Repub Iran. 2016 Dec 28;30:466. eCollection 2016.
     
  16. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The effects of calcaneal posture on thoracolumbar alignment in a standing position.
    Kim SC et al
    J Phys Ther Sci. 2017 Nov;29(11):1993-1995. doi: 10.1589/jpts.29.1993
     
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