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Genetic risk factors for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by NewsBot, Nov 26, 2016.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Posterior tibial tendinopathy associated with Matrix Metalloproteinase 13 promoter genotype and haplotype.
    de Araujo Munhoz FB et al
    J Gene Med. 2016 Nov 25. doi: 10.1002/jgm.2934.
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. Dieter Fellner

    Dieter Fellner Well-Known Member

    I always enjoy reading about the hereditary disposition for a foot complaint but always struggle to know what to Rx to address the deficiency. Oh well.... it makes for a good stocking filler when talking to a patient about matrix metalloproteases, polymorphisms and alleles....
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Does MMP-3 polymorphism have a role in the etiology of the posterior tibial tendinopathy?
    A.L. Godoy-Santos et al
    Fuß & Sprunggelenk; 12 March 2017
     
  5. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Reading the full text, they wrongly used the term "tendinopathy" - it was about "dysfunction"
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and (MMP-8) gene polymorphisms promote increase and remodeling of the collagen III and V in posterior tibial tendinopathy.
    Diniz-Fernandes T et al
    Histol Histopathol. 2018 Mar 13:11982. doi: 10.14670/HH-11-982.
     
  7. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Reading the full text, they wrongly used the term "tendinopathy" - it was about "dysfunction"
     
  8. Dieter Fellner

    Dieter Fellner Well-Known Member

    I don't have access but will hazard a guess the 'dysfunction' is a consequence of the tendinopathy. The authors evaluate identifiable gene polymorphism and variations between control v disease group. In any event, it's of little consequence to the management protocol. Somewhat like hallux valgus and familial / genetic tendency. Makes for an educated discussion with a patient but it's a 'so what'. Too late to change your parents.
     
  9. terigreen

    terigreen Active Member

    I have noticed that there is a particular patient who always comes in with posterior tib dysfunction. The narrow foot, with pes planus as a child that gets progressively worse with age. Too bad they don't come in as a child and wait until their ankle and knees begin to hurt. Unfortunately, foot care is an afterthought for so many people. A good orthotic as a child can make such a difference for so many patients.

    Teri Green
    Atlas Biomechanics
     
  10. Dieter Fellner

    Dieter Fellner Well-Known Member

    Teri: I concur the narrow unstable foot is often the 'pes planus' foot (talot tarsal subluxation foot). In my patient population this foot-type does not commonly dominate the correlation with PTTD . Instead the fat, forty & female characterization, often holds true. Along with the finding of the medially deviated STJ axis. Be that,as it may, I also want to believe this is a preventable problem if only proactive, early, intervention, can be implemented. Alas, we'll never know. I have come to realize, over the last 30 years, that assigning the female 'psyche' away from summer sandals and 'pretty shoes' towards 'sensible shoes and foot orthoses' for the promise of a 'better foot' is (mostly) beyond my powers. If only there was an internal orthotic ;-)
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    ERα PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms in postmenopausal women with posterior tibial tendon dysfunction: a case control study
    P. A. Pontin et al
    Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research201813:316
     
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