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Leg strength in runners over 50 yrs declines significantly

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Sep 24, 2013.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Power of lower extremities is most important determinant of agility among physically inactive or active adult people
    Sirpa Manderoos Mariitta Vaara Sirkka‐Liisa Karppi Sirkka Aunola Pauli Puukka Jukka Surakka Esko Mälkiä
    Physiotherapy Research International
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Neither total muscle activation nor co-activation explains the youthful walking economy of older runners
    Owen N. Beck et al
    Gait and Posture; Article in Press
     
  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Influence of Aging on Lower Extremity Sagittal Plane Variability During 5 Essential Sub-phases of Stance in Male Recreational Runners
    Jacqueline Morgan et al
    Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, 2018 Volume:0 Issue:0 Pages:1–29 DOI: 10.2519/jospt.2019.8419
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The Physiology and Biomechanics of the Master Runner
    Willy, Richard W., PT, PhD; Paquette, Max R., PhD
    Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Review: March 2019 - Volume 27 - Issue 1 - p 15–21
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Inter-joint coordination patterns differ between younger and older runners
    KathrynHarrisonaYong UngKwonbAdamSimacBhushanThakkaraGregoryCrosswellaJacquelineMorganaD.S.Blaise WilliamsIIId
    Human Movement Science; Volume 64, April 2019, Pages 164-170
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effect of aging on muscle and tendon properties in highly functioning elderly people
    Birgit Pötzelsberger Alexander Kösters Thomas Finkenzeller Erich Müller
    Scan J SM
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Lower limb tri-joint synchrony during running gait: A longitudinal age-based study
    CeriDissaDomenicoVicinanzabLeeSmithcGenevieve K.R.Williamsd
    Human Movement Science; August 2019, Pages 301-309
     
  8. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Ankle kinetics and plantarflexor morphology in older runners with different lifetime running exposures
    Ramzi M.MajajDouglas W.PowellLawrence W.WeissMax R.Paquette
    Human Movement Science
     
  9. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Age-related decrease in performance of male masters athletes in sprint, sprint–endurance, and endurance events
    Samuel da Silva Aguiar, Caio V. Sousa, Marcelo M. Sales, Higor G. Sousa, Patrick A. Santos, Lucas D. Barbosa, Patrício L. Leite, Thiago S. Rosa, Fábio Y. Nakamura, Marko T. Korhonen & Herbert G. Simões
    Sport Sciences for Health volume 16, pages385–392(2020)
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    NEWS RELEASE 9-SEP-2020
    Muscle aging: Stronger for longer

    With life expectancy increasing, age-related diseases are also on the rise, including sarcopenia, the loss of muscle mass due to aging. Researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum have demonstrated that a well-known drug can delay the progression of age-related muscle weakness.

    Already in our best years, our muscles begin to shrink and their strength dwindles. Unfortunately, this is a natural part of aging. For some people, the decline in muscle mass and function is excessive. This condition, called sarcopenia, affects every second or third person over 80, reducing mobility, autonomy and quality of life.

    The causes of sarcopenia are diverse, ranging from altered muscle metabolism to changes in the nerves supplying muscles. Researchers led by Professor Markus Rüegg have now discovered that mTORC1 also contributes to sarcopenia and its suppression with the well-known drug rapamycin slows age-related muscle wasting.

    Rapamycin preserves muscle function
    "Contrary to our expectations, the long-term mTORC1 suppression with rapamycin is overwhelmingly beneficial for skeletal muscle aging in mice, preserving muscle size and strength," says Daniel Ham, first author of the study. "Neuromuscular junctions, the sites where neurons contact muscle fibers to control their contraction, deteriorate during aging. Stable neuromuscular junctions are paramount to maintaining healthy muscles during aging and rapamycin effectively stabilizes them." The researchers also demonstrate that permanently activating mTORC1 in skeletal muscle accelerates muscle aging.

    Molecular signature of sarcopenia
    In collaboration with Professor Mihaela Zavolan's team, the scientists identified a molecular ?signature? of sarcopenia, with mTORC1 as the key player. To help the scientific community further investigate how gene expression in skeletal muscle changes during aging or in response to rapamycin treatment, they developed the user-friendly web application, SarcoAtlas, which is supported by sciCORE, the Center for Scientific Computing at the University of Basel.

    There is currently no effective pharmacological therapy to treat sarcopenia. This study provides hope that it may be possible to slow down age-related muscle wasting with treatments that suppress mTORC1 and thereby extend the autonomy and life quality of elderly people.
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Age-related differences in gastrocnemii muscles and Achilles tendon mechanical properties in vivo☆
    IndiaLindemann et al
    Journal of Biomechanics 28 September 2020, 110067
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Absence of an aging‐related increase in fiber type grouping in athletes and non‐athletes
    Guy A. M. Messa Mathew Piasecki Jörn Rittweger Jamie S. McPhee Erika Koltai Zsolt Radak Bostjan Simunic Ari Heinonen Harri Suominen Marko T. Korhonen Hans Degens
    24 July 2020
     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Age and Training Volume Influence Joint Kinetics During Running
    Max R. Paquette Douglas W. Powell Paul DeVita
    20 October 2020
     
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Longitudinal trends in master track and field performance throughout the aging process: 83,209 results from Sweden in 16 athletics disciplines
    Bergita Ganse, Anthony Kleerekoper, Matthias Knobe, Frank Hildebrand & Hans Degens
    GeroScience (2020)
     
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