Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Sponsored Content: The Interpod Keystone for measuring supination resistance. Read about it here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

Mycetoma (Madura foot)

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by NewsBot, Dec 4, 2010.

Tags:
  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Mycetoma of the Foot Caused by Madurella Mycetomatis in Immigrants from Sudan.
    Brufman T, Ben-Ami R, Mizrahi M, Bash E, Paran Y.
    Isr Med Assoc J. 2015 Jul;17(7):418-20.
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Eumycetoma Osteomyelitis of the Calcaneus in a Child: A Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation following Total Calcanectomy.
    El-Sobky TA, Haleem JF, Samir S
    Case Rep Pathol. 2015;2015:129020.
     
  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Mycetoma: a unique neglected tropical disease
    Prof Eduard E Zijlstra, PhD, Wendy W J van de Sande, PhD, Prof Oliverio Welsh, DSc, Prof El Sheikh Mahgoub, FRCPath, Prof Michael Goodfellow, DSc, Prof Ahmed H Fahal, FRCS
    Lancet Infectious Diseases; Volume 16, No. 1, p100?112, January 2016
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Mycetoma: a unique neglected tropical disease.
    Zijlstra EE et al
    Lancet Infect Dis. 2016 Jan;16(1):100-12
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Madura foot in Europe: diagnosis of an autochthonous case by molecular approach and review of the literature.
    Mencarini J et al
    New Microbiol. 2016 Feb;39(2):156-159.
     
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Role of a NSAID in the apparent cure of a fungal mycetoma.
    Dupont B et al
    J Mycol Med. 2016 May 24.
     
  8. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Madura foot caused by Gordonia terrae misdiagnosed as Nocardia.
    Zampella JG et al
    Australas J Dermatol. 2016 Jun 7. doi: 10.1111/ajd.12516
     
  9. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The Surgical Treatment of Mycetoma
    Suleiman Hussein Suleiman, EL Sammani Wadaella, Ahmed Hassan Fahal
    PLoS Negl Trop Dis 10(6): e0004690
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Mycetoma in a non-endemic area: a diagnostic challenge.
    Efared B et al
    BMC Clin Pathol. 2017 Feb 2;17:1. doi: 10.1186/s12907-017-0040-5. eCollection 2017.
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Dot-in-Circle Sign - A Diagnostic MRI Sign for "Madura Foot".
    Javed F et al
    J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2017 Mar;27(3):S8-S10. doi: 236.
     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Mycetoma (Madura Foot) in Israel: Recent Cases and a Systematic Review of the Literature
    Ohad Bitan, Yonit Wiener-Well, Rina Segal and Eli Schwartz
    The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene; 03 April 2017
     
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
  15. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    PUBLIC RELEASE: 19-JUN-2017
    Clinical trial for a better treatment for mycetoma starts in Sudan
    First ever double-blind study for disease so neglected that it only recently was added to WHO list of neglected tropical diseases
    The first-ever double-blind, randomized clinical trial for an effective treatment for the severely neglected disease mycetoma has enrolled its first patient at the Mycetoma Research Centre (MRC) in Khartoum, Sudan.

    Mycetoma is a chronic infection mainly of the foot that may spread to other parts of the body and causes severe deformity. Infection probably comes from the soil or animal dung, and it is thought that most patients are infected by walking barefoot and thus sustain minor cuts of thorns of the acacia tree.

    The disease is endemic in tropical and subtropical areas of what is coined the 'mycetoma belt', which includes Venezuela, Chad, Ethiopia, India, Mauritania, Mexico, Senegal, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen. Most countries are located between 30°N and 15°S, with Sudan the epicenter of the disease. It affects the poorest of the poor in poor remote communities. It has severe negative impacts on patients, families, communities and health authorities in endemic areas.

    The trial seeks to compare the efficacy of a potential new treatment, fosravuconazole, to the existing therapy in people suffering from moderate eumycetoma, the fungal form of mycetoma. Today, the existing anti-fungal treatments for people suffering from eumycetoma only cure a fraction of patients, have a long treatment duration of a minimum of 12 months, are toxic, and cost an equivalent to more than a month's wage in the rural community. This means that the treatment is beyond the incomes of many rural poor and consequently affected patients often need an amputation to control the infection. In some the disease runs a fatal course.

    "With the first patient enrolled now, what we have been working towards for the last ten years is at last a reality," said Dr Ahmed Fahal, Professor of Surgery at the University of Khartoum and Director of the MRC. "An effective, safe, affordable and shorter-term curative treatment which is appropriate for rural settings is desperately needed for neglected patients suffering from mycetoma."

    The study is being conducted by Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) and the MRC together with Eisai Co., Ltd a Japanese pharmaceutical company which is providing the trial drug fosravuconazole. Since the intention to carry out the study was announced, the MRC has been preparing by following up national regulatory body approvals, strengthening laboratory functions and training of the MRC staff. Screening of potential patients began at the beginning of the month of May and the first patient was enrolled soon after.

    "This important milestone comes one year after the landmark decision to include mycetoma in the list of the World Health Organization's official list of neglected tropical diseases," said Dr Nathalie Strub-Wourgaft, Medical Director, DNDi. "We are finally starting to roll the ball towards ending the neglect of patients suffering from mycetoma."
     
  16. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Mycetoma: An update.
    Relhan V, Mahajan K, Agarwal P, Garg VK.
    Indian J Dermatol 2017;62:332-40 (full text)
    Mycetoma is a localized chronic, suppurative, and deforming granulomatous infection seen in tropical and subtropical areas. It is a disorder of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones, mainly of feet, characterized by a triad of localized swelling, underlying sinus tracts, and production of grains or granules. Etiological classification divides it into eumycetoma caused by fungus, and actinomycetoma caused by bacteria. Since the treatment of these two etiologies is entirely different, a definite diagnosis after histopathological and microbiological examination is mandatory, though difficult. Serological test exists but is not so reliable; however, molecular techniques to identify relevant antigens have shown promise. The disease is notoriously difficult to treat. Eumycetoma may be unresponsive to standard antifungal therapy. Actinomycetoma responds to antibiotic therapy, but prolonged treatment is necessary.This review focuses on the etiopathogenesis, clinical features, laboratory diagnosis, and treatment of mycetoma.
     

Share This Page