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NaOH vs wedge resection techniques for ingrown toenail

Discussion in 'Foot Surgery' started by NewsBot, Apr 25, 2014.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Exploring postoperative outcomes for ingrown toenails. NaOH vs wedge resection techniques.
    Pérez-Rey J, Mediavilla-Saldaña L, Martínez-Nova A.
    Dermatol Surg. 2014 Mar;40(3):281-7.
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Chemical Matricectomy With Sodium Hydroxide: Long-Term Follow-up Results.
    Bostanci, Seher MD; Kocyigit, Pelin MD; Parlak, Nehir MD; Gungor, Hilayda Karakok MD
    Dermatologic Surgery: October 2, 2014
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Complications of Sodium Hydroxide Chemical Matrixectomy.
    Seher Bostancı, Pelin Koçyiğit, Hilayda Karakök Güngör, and Nehir Parlak
    Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association: November 2014, Vol. 104, No. 6, pp. 649-651.
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Controlled trial comparing the efficacy of 88% phenol versus 10% sodium hydroxide for chemical matricectomy in the management of ingrown toenail.
    Grover C, Khurana A, Bhattacharya SN, Sharma A.
    Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol [serial online] 2015 [cited 2015 Sep 3];81:472-7
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    COMPARISON OF EFFICACY OF PHENOL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE
    MATRICECTOMIES FOR MANAGEMENT OF INGROWN TOENAILS

    Abdul Jabbar Arif, Shahid Majeed, Ammara Arif
    Pak Armed Forces Med J 2015; 65(5): 630-34
     
  7. rjames

    rjames Member

    Does anyone have any personal experience using the sodium hydroxide?
     
  8. rosherville

    rosherville Active Member

    The alkalis tend to be absorbed in a less predictable manner than the acids, avoid would be my advice.
     
  9. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Surgical Treatment of Ingrown Toenail by Nail Fold Resection
    without Matricectomy

    Ahmed Mohammad Ahmed Mohammad, Mohammad Elsayed Radwan, Mohammad
    Arafat Abdel-Maksoud
    The Egyptian Journal of Hospital Medicine (October 2018) Vol. 73 (11), Page 7951-7962
    1597

     
  10. hill

    hill Active Member

    Are there any studies/statistics supporting the idea about phenol being carcinogenic and that we should be avoiding phenol for our own health concerns. Any statistics of podiatrists that have been affected?
     
  11. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    7
    There is no data that I know of on that.
     
  12. hill

    hill Active Member

    perhaps that’s a good sign
     
  13. Dieter Fellner

    Dieter Fellner Well-Known Member

    I used phenol in England and mostly sodium hydroxide in the US. On balance, irrespective of what the 'articles' proclaim, I prefer phenol. As for carcinogenic risks .....phhffftttt. Phenol used to be an active ingredient for sore throat spray and got pulled for that reason. The old stuff worked great, the new stuff sucks.
     
  14. hill

    hill Active Member

    It seems that phenol is still the most popular. Do you know of any stats regarding podiatrists and cancer? It seems that if we don’t know any major stats that perhaps they aren’t there?
     
  15. Dieter Fellner

    Dieter Fellner Well-Known Member

    I am not aware of any stats .... oftentime this type of information is the product of hysteria or connected with an unrelated field of work.

    More recently I heard a similar 'scare' story concerning ethyl chloride spray. I know some of the hospitals have pulled the item off the shelf.
     
  16. hill

    hill Active Member

    We have a local podiatrist here who is currently very sick with cancer. Until then he was doing quite a lot of phenolisations. Kind of makes you stop and think about the issue.
     
  17. Dieter Fellner

    Dieter Fellner Well-Known Member

    That's very sad, indeed. However, I would imagine there would be many more such reports if this can be linked to the use of phenol. Cancer, unfortunately, happens for many diverse reasons. One way, to investigate, is to have the diagnoses and attempt a correlation with causative / contributing factors.

    Association is not necessarily causation.

    The EPA cancer classification for phenol is D, not classifiable as to humancarcinogenicity (IRIS 2006). ... The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) has classified phenol as an A4 carcinogen (not classifiable as a human carcinogen) (ACGIH 2005).
    Toxicological Profile for Phenol - Agency for Toxic Substances and ...


    https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/tp115-c8.pdf
     
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