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Overuse injury vs training load error

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Feb 4, 2016.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Letter
    Time to bin the term overuse injury: is training load error a more accurate term?

    Br J Sports Med doi:10.1136/bjsports-2015-095543
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2016
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    How do training and competition workloads relate to injury? The workload—injury aetiology model
    Johann Windt, Tim J Gabbett
    Br J Sports Med doi:10.1136/bjsports-2016-096040
     
  3. HansMassage

    HansMassage Active Member

    I usually use the term repetitive stress; perhaps more accurately distress from repetitive mechanically unsound stress. Training error would cover that in context but for activities of daily living I find that the error is antalgic pain avoidance resulting in mechanically stressing other tissue to the point of noxious pain as a warning not to continue such action
     
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    Consensus statement
    How much is too much? (Part 1) International Olympic Committee consensus statement on load in sport and risk of injury

    Torbjorn Soligard et al
    Br J Sports Med 2016;50:1030-1041 doi:10.1136/bjsports-2016-096581 (full text)
     
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