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Plantar fasciitis and tight gastrocs

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Feb 4, 2011.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Association between plantar fasciitis and isolated contracture of the gastrocnemius.
    Patel A, Digiovanni B.
    Foot Ankle Int. 2011 Jan;32(1):5-8.
     
  2. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Huh? This sounds like a cross sectional design to me...

    Anyone got a full copy?
     
  3. IG if you could kind sir it would be grand to have read of the full text.
     
  4. both posts written at Same time, so thats a no.

    Would love a copy if anyone can help.
     
  5. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Sorry mate - not one I have a subscription to unfortunately.

    Hopefully someone else can help us out.
     
  6. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Yes, it was a cross-sectional and NOT a prospective study design :bash:
     
  7. Ian or Craig why does this matter ? Ie what is a cross sectional or prospective design when it gets up in the morning and how does it change this re the above paper ?

    Off topic but would like to know and too lazy to add to my reading list at the min.
     
  8. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    In a nutshell:

    Prospective:You measure dorsiflexion stiffness at ankle, then follow cohort for period of time and see who develops PF. Run stats.

    Cross-sectional: Your cohort already has PF, and you measure dorsiflexion stiffness at ankle. Run stats.

    Prospective design will be much more valid at suggesting causation. You can't infer causation from a cross-sectional design, you can only conclude there may be a correlation.

    So in this case we cannot conclude from this study that tight gastrocnemii are a risk factor for PF. (As it may be that PF causes tight gastrocnemii for example)
     
  9. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    ...what Ian said.

    With a prospective study design, you can deteremine causation and risk factors
    With a cross sectional study design, you can only get correlations.

    The above study was cross sectional and they only showed a correlation between plantar fasciitis and tight gastrocs. From this cross sectional design you can not determine if the tight gastrocs caused the plantar fasciitis or the plantar fasciitis caused the tight gastrocs. A prospective study design would deteremine what caused what.

    The authors above claimed it was a prosepctive design when is was only cross-sectional. However, they were appropriatly cautious in stating the conclusion:
    and also, the gastrocs are tight, so if its a "chicken or egg" probably does not matter clinically, as they need stretching and/or heel raise, and/or the fibula mobilized, and/or a surgical lengthening (Gastroc recession cured 93.6% of chronic plantar fasciitis)
     
  10. RobinP

    RobinP Well-Known Member

    I would imagine that most prospective studies require a large cohort if the idea is to see if the risk factor is causal (?) in the pathology. That would lend it greater validity also?
     
  11. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    I'm no expert, but this is where power analysis is important.

    Also, the descriptive statistics (sex, age, weight etc) will have to be considered before extrapolations can be made to the whole population.
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Tight tendoachilles as etiological factor in plantar fasciitis
    Terence Derryl L. Dsouza, Ronald Menezes
    International Journal of Recent Trends in Science and Technology December 2014; 13(2): 313-316
     
  13. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Association Between Plantar Fasciitis and Isolated Gastrocnemius Tightness.
    Nakale NT et al
    Foot Ankle Int. 2017 Dec 1:1071100717744175. doi: 10.1177/1071100717744175.
     
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