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Running shoe / rearfoot slippage

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by markjohconley, Sep 10, 2017.

  1. markjohconley

    markjohconley Well-Known Member


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    Question for the running shoe pundits.
    I was buying a new pair and tried the NB 940 as have used NB's before without problems.
    Doing my test circuits around the shop perimeter I was surprised at the perceived amount of rearfoot slipping / lifting (not sure of correct term) as I have never had / felt this problem before. The laces were laced by the shop attendant (as I obviously look my age) to the first eyelet on the collar, as I usually do.
    I then tried, and purchased a Brooks Bear? which didn't seem to have the problem, as much.

    Question
    Have the more recent running shoes less depth in the rearfoot (the top line / feather line seemed much lower relative to my malleoli), and / or greater stiffness in the midsole (beneath the forefoot and midfoot) and / or a shorter quarter / collar / throat which are the reasons I imagine responsible for rearfoot slipping / lifting out of the shoe?
    Thanks, mark
     
  2. markjohconley

    markjohconley Well-Known Member

    Are there any other factors that could be responsible for the rearfoot to slip / lift out of the shoe whilst walking / running?
     
  3. markjohconley

    markjohconley Well-Known Member

    I am thinking it might be 'function being sacrificed for aesthetics'?
     
  4. Phil Wells

    Phil Wells Active Member

    Did you compare material density at the heel - Softer verse harder material changing ankle joint stiffness with the resulting change in ankle AROM?
     
  5. markjohconley

    markjohconley Well-Known Member

    Thanks Phil.
    No I did not. Would a softer heel mid-sole result in increased ankle dorsiflexion stiffness and thus limit the dorsiflexion ROM resulting in a earlier than otherwise heel lift?
     
  6. Phil Wells

    Phil Wells Active Member

    Hi Mark

    I am struggling to find the research but I think the softer material increased ankle joint stiffness and vice verse but I stand ready to be corrected as I can't quite remember and might of got them mixed up with the associated changes in the knee joint stiffness. I way the ankle joint excursion would change.
     
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