Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

Shank-dependent v shank-independent foot orthoses

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by markjohconley, Mar 7, 2016.

  1. markjohconley

    markjohconley Well-Known Member


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    I asked in another thread, "so unless the surface of the insole (of the shoe) is considered (incorporated) in the milling process then wouldn't there likely be a change of the surface topography of the (shank-dependent) orthoses (with applied load)?".
    ..... which, obviously, would alter the forces from the foot orthoses. This is in comparison to shank-independent foot orthoses.
    Yes/no?

    I have reposted as no replies to my previous post were made (which admittedly is not unusual for my posts)

    mark
     
  2. efuller

    efuller MVP

    "Supported" EVA behaves a lot differently than unsupported EVA. Solidly supported EVA, if high enough durometer, can deform less than plastic. If there is a gap between the EVA and the shank of the shoe, the EVA device will deform quite easily when loaded. Conversely, if the EVA device made for a shoe that has a flat interior is placed in a shoe with some "arch" the EVA device will bend over the arch and have a higher arch than it would in the flat shoe. So, the shank dependent orthotic has to be ground, on its underside, to match the shape of the shoe that it is placed in. The device will feel different when placed in shoes with a different shank shape.

    The shank independent device will be much less likely to have changes in the shape of the top surface of the device when placed in different shoes.

    Is that what you were asking?

    Eric
     
  3. markjohconley

    markjohconley Well-Known Member

    Exactly, thanks Eric, I did use the Search facility but couldn't find this mentioned, as far as I got
     
Loading...

Share This Page