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Subtalar joint muscle strength and balance/falls

Discussion in 'Gerontology' started by NewsBot, Jul 4, 2019.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Associations between Subtalar Muscle Strength and Balance Performance in Healthy Young and Old Adults.
    Hagen M et al
    Gerontology. 2019 Jul 2:1-9
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The effects of intrinsic foot muscle strengthening on functional mobility in older adults: A systematic review
    Erin E Futrell et al
    J Am Geriatr Soc. 2021 Oct 30
     
  3. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    When it comes to toe flexor strength, recent research from Goldman et al 2021 and D'Aout et al 2021, makes it abundantly clear that the toe flexor strength of young heathy adults, who habitually wear shoes, is probably as low as 50% of natural levels.

    Starting with this baseline a further reduction in over 65s of 30% of the existing 50%, means that the toe flexor strength of this group is 35% of natural, hab shod, young adult, levels .

    Add in shoes with a toe spring, which mean that the toes are far less effective at applying force to the ground during simple weight shifting, and we a fall in the making .

    I note that Futrell et al have concluded, " IFMS interventions contributed to improvements in strength, balance, mobility, and possibly reduced fall risk. There was little effect on gait. Subjective reports indicate a possible mechanism for improved mobility may be from increased proprioception and sensation. "

    However, exercises like the short foot exercise, commonly employed for foot strengthening are, in my opinion ,ineffective . That is to say they make little difference compared to other strengthening means ,for example the 6 month intervention of D'Aout .

    To help reduce falls in older people you have to effectively strengthen the toe flexors and allow them to apply force to the ground rather than simply, partially, depressing a toe spring .
     
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