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Surgery for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction

Discussion in 'Foot Surgery' started by NewsBot, Jul 8, 2008.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effect of the additional first ray osteotomy on hindfoot alignment after calcaneal osteotomy for the correction of mild-to-moderate adult type pes plano-valgus.
    Choi JY et al
    J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong). 2017 Jan 1;25(1):2309499016684747. doi: 10.1177/2309499016684747.
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Posterior Tibial Tendon Endoscopic Debridement for Stage I and II Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction.
    Wake J, Martin K
    Arthrosc Tech. 2017 Oct 30;6(5):e2019-e2022. doi: 10.1016/j.eats.2017.07.023. eCollection 2017 Oct.
     
  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Press Release:
    Study Finds Flatfoot Reconstruction Effective for Older Patients
    HSS study is the first to examine reconstruction clinical outcomes in this population

    New Orleans, LA—March 10, 2018

    When someone develops adult-acquired flatfoot deformity (AAFD), they are offered either a reconstruction or foot fusion depending on the severity of the flatfoot and their age. Typically reconstructions are performed in younger patients while older patients undergo fusions, even though it can limit mobility.

    Researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) presented study findings today at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) that were the first to compare the outcomes of reconstructions on older patients to those of a younger group.

    The study evaluated patients over 65 with stage II AAFD to see if there are worse clinical outcomes or an increased number of subsequent surgical procedures following flatfoot reconstruction when compared to younger patients.

    "Overall, flatfoot reconstruction provides better long-term outcomes and mobility of the foot when compared to foot fusions," said Scott J. Ellis, MD, foot and ankle surgeon at HSS and senior study author. "However, there is a chance that reconstruction could fail, and to avoid a long, arduous recovery with multiple surgeries, patients older than 65 commonly skip reconstruction and opt for a fusion."

    "My colleagues and I wanted to investigate if this was still a viable option for elderly patients in the hopes of maintaining flexibility in their foot," Dr. Ellis added.

    Over 130 HSS patients were assessed in three groups based on their age: less than 45 years old (young); 45 to 65 years old (middle-aged); and 65 years and older (old).

    This study measured clinical outcomes using the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) and compared preoperative and postoperative scores at a minimum of two years. Findings indicated that patients in the older group did not demonstrate any differences in their outcomes compared with patients in the young and middle-aged groups.

    Additionally, older patients were not more likely to undergo a subsequent removal of hardware or revision procedures than patients in the younger cohorts.

    "Our initial hypothesis was that there would be increased complications for patients in the older group. However, we saw positive, consistent surgical outcomes across all age groups," said Dr. Ellis. "Depending on the severity of the condition, we believe a flatfoot reconstruction is a great option for patients regardless of their age. For the right patient, it can be the last surgery that they need."

    Dr. Ellis believes that older patients have not often been offered a flatfoot reconstruction by their surgeons since there has not been enough research to critically review surgical outcomes. The loss of mobility with a fusion is something patients need to consider and discuss with their surgeon along with their expectations.

    "This is strong evidence to support that flatfoot reconstruction can be an option for everyone, but we need to continue to follow patient clinical outcomes over an extended period of time to provide more data for this sparsely investigated topic," Dr. Ellis stated.
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Surgical Management of Stage 2 Adult and Pediatric Acquired Flatfoot Without Tendon Transfer or Arthrodesis: A Retrospective Study
    Ashim Wadehra, DPM et al
    JFAS; Article in Press
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Double calcaneal osteotomy with minimally invasive surgery for the treatment of severe flexible flatfeet
    Hany Mourkus, Hari Prem
    International Orthopaedics: 26 March 2018
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Contribution of Medial Cuneiform Osteotomy to Correction of Longitudinal Arch Collapse in Stage IIb Adult-Acquired Flatfoot Deformity.
    Kunas GC et al
    Foot Ankle Int. 2018 Apr 1:1071100718768020.
     
  7. Arnold Blake

    Arnold Blake Welcome New Poster

    Here was my solution:

    - Neutral low profile shoes (4mm drop and below)
    - No orthotics
    - No icing
    - Resistance band exercises
    - Run through it

    Overall, fix your running form/gait (so that you forefoot strike). If you have a proper running gait, you will never get running overuse injuries.
     
  8. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Seriously? Totally clueless. Anyone treating posterior tibial tendon dysfunction that way, is incompetent; guaranteeing that it will need surgery and be a permanent disability; and probably loose their license to practice.

    You do realise that this thread is on 'posterior tibial tendon dysfunction'- I am assuming that you have no idea what that is and confused it with tendonitis/tendinopathy ? ... in which case, you should not be posting such nonsense in a pubic forum when you clearly have no idea what you are talking about.

    and BTW, forefoot striking and a lower drop shoes increases the load on the posterior tibial tendon, so you are giving really bad advice anyway for those with tendinopathy ... you really should be leaving this stuff to those who actually know what they are doing.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 8, 2018
  9. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Contribution of Medial Cuneiform Osteotomy to Correction of Longitudinal Arch Collapse in Stage IIb Adult-Acquired Flatfoot Deformity
    Grace C. Kunas, BA, Huong T. Do, MS, Amiethab Aiyer, MD, ...
    Foot & Ankle International April 5, 2018
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Combined Spring and Deltoid Ligament Repair in Adult-Acquired Flatfoot
    Caio Nery, MD, André Vitor Kerber C. Lemos, MD, Fernando Raduan, MD, ...
    Foot & Ankle International April 16, 2018
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Outcomes of Reconstruction of the Stage II Adult Acquired Flatfoot Deformity in Older Patients
    Matthew Conti, MD, Mackenzie Jones, BA, Joseph Nguyen, MPH, ...
    Foot & Ankle Orthopaedics April 19, 2018
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Outcomes of Reconstruction of the Stage II Adult-Acquired Flatfoot Deformity in Older Patients
    Matthew S. Conti, MD, Mackenzie T. Jones, BS, Oleksandr Savenkov, PhD, ...
    Foot & Ankle International May 18, 2018
     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effect of the calcaneal medializing osteotomy on soft tissues supporting the plantar arch: A computational study.
    Larrainzar-Garijo R et al
    Rev Esp Cir Ortop Traumatol. 2018 Jun 12.
     
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Surgical treatment of stage II posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction: ten-year clinical and radiographic results.
    Ruffilli A et al
    Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol. 2018 Jan;28(1):139-145.
     
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