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Chimpanzee Feet Allow Scientists a New Grasp on Human Foot Evolution

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by NewsBot, Feb 14, 2017.

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  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    News Release:
    Chimpanzee Feet Allow Scientists a New Grasp on Human Foot Evolution
    FEBRUARY 8, 2017
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Chimpanzee and human midfoot motion during bipedal walking and the evolution of the longitudinal arch of the foot.
    Nicholas B. Holowka, Matthew C. O'Neill, Nathan E. Thompson, Brigitte Demes.
    Journal of Human Evolution, 2017; 104: 23
     
  3. Rob Kidd

    Rob Kidd Well-Known Member

    MMMmmmm. Apples and oranges, me thinks. What seems to be being reported is that (while they do not use the term), a substantial midtarsal break occurs in chimpanzee feet during midstance - that does not occur in normal human feet. That is, to a first approximation the midtarsal oblique axis undergoes a substantial "pronation" in chimpanzees. The human foot is noted to undergo a greater range of motion - but in the other direction - ie midtarsal oblique axis supination - presumably as a result of the windlass effect. While I suspect an actual quantification & comparison of the amount of movement has not been undertaken before, they are not the same thing. Unless of course, that I have missed the point. Huge amounts of this sort of work came out of Rob Crompton's lab in Liverpool during the first decade of this century.
     
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