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Intrinsic foot muscles morphology and Achilles tendinopathy

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Oct 4, 2019.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Intrinsic foot muscles morphological modifications in patients with Achilles tendinopathy: A novel case-control research study
    Carlos RomeroMoralesaPedro JavierMartín LlantinoaCésarCalvo LobocJaime AlmazánPoloaDaniel LópezLópezbBlanca de la CruzTorresdPatricia PalomoLópezeDavid RodríguezSanzc
    Physical Therapy in Sport; 3 October 2019
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
  3. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    Looking at the paper mentioned in the first post , it would seem that Achilles tendinopathy can lead to increased intrinsic foot muscle size . So in these cases , perhaps the intrinsic and extrisic foot muscles are being asked to do more to take stress away from plantar fascia and hence the Achilles , during gait .( A closer relationship seem to exist between the Achilles and the PF than between the Achilles and the foot intrinsics ).

    So potentially the intrinsic/ extrinsic foot muscle system gets stronger to protect the Achilles /PF system ( I realize that there is a great deal of interaction between the two but believe that separate relationships can possibly be teased out ) .

    So with plantar fasciitis , why do the intrinsics not get stronger to unload the plantar fascia ?
     
  4. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    Further to the relationship between the Achilles tendon and the plantar fascia ,the following is of interest -

    Abstract
    " The plantar aponeurosis transmits large forces between the hindfoot and forefoot during the stance phase of gait. The varying pattern of plantar aponeurosis force and its relationship to Achilles tendon force demonstrates the importance of analyzing the function of the plantar aponeurosis throughout the stance phase of the gait cycle rather than in a static standing position. Clinical Relevance: The plantar aponeurosis plays an important role in transmitting Achilles tendon forces to the forefoot in the latter part of the stance phase of walking. Surgical procedures that require the release of this structure may disturb this mechanism and thus compromise efficient propulsion."

    Link to paper -
    (PDF) Dynamic Loading of the Plantar Aponeurosis in Walking


     
  5. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    Further to the idea of pain in elements of the foot and ankle , muscle/ligament/tendon systems , being compensated for by increased activity in other components of the systems , this from a recent paper (link below ).

    Highlights


    TP pain and simulated reduced TP muscle strength caused alteredmuscle recruitment.

    Flexor digitorum longus and flexor hallucis longus compensates for the TP muscle.

    The found compensating strategy puts higher forces on the ankle joint.

    This could be a contributing factor to development of forefoot pain in RA.


    Paper
    A parametric study of effect of experimental tibialis posterior muscle pain on joint loading and muscle forces—Implications for patients with rheumatoid arthritis?

    MB Simonsen, A Yurtsever, K Næsborg-Andersen… - Gait & posture, 2019 - Elsevier
    Background Foot pain and deformities are commonly encountered in patients with
    rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Likewise, Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is commonly
    involved in development of foot and ankle abnormalities and has been reported with a …
    Related articles All 7 versions
     
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