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Melanoma of the foot

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by NewsBot, Oct 30, 2009.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Surgical excision margin for primary acral melanoma.
    Lee KT et al
    J Surg Oncol. 2016 Dec;114(8):933-939. doi: 10.1002/jso.24442
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Press Release:
    UI researchers document how melanoma tumors form
    Team identifies drugs that halt skin cancer metastasis in lab tests
    Melanoma cells move quickly, extending cables to reel in other cells and form tumors

     
  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Clinical factors associated with subclinical spread of in situ melanoma.
    Shin TM et al
    J Am Acad Dermatol. 2017 Apr;76(4):707-713. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2016.10.049
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Acral Melanoma and Mechanical Stress on the Plantar Surface of the Foot
    N Engl J Med 2017; 377:395-396July 27, 2017DOI: 10.1056/NEJMc1706162
    full text letter
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Interdigital Melanoma of the Foot Affecting Two Neighbouring Interdigital Spaces - Second Case Report.
    Wollina U et al
    Open Access Maced J Med Sci. 2017 Jul 19;5(4):448-450
     
  6. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
  7. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Acral melanoma foot lesions. Part 1: epidemiology, aetiology, and molecular pathology.
    Desai A et al
    Clin Exp Dermatol. 2017 Sep 22. doi: 10.1111/ced.13243.
     
  8. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Delay in diagnosis of acral melanoma.
    Rheingantz da Cunha Filho R, Matte L, Hohmann Camina R.
    Dermatol Online J. 2016 Oct 15;22(10). pii: 13030/qt0gr3p9xk.
     
  9. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Melanoma of the Foot Is Associated With Advanced Disease and Poorer Survival
    Barbara E. Adams et al
    JFAS; Article in Press
     
  10. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    PUBLIC RELEASE: 28-NOV-2017
    This 'sweet spot' could improve Melanoma diagnosis

    Too much, too little, just right. It might seem like a line from "Goldilocks and the Three Bears," but actually describes an important finding from researchers in Florida Atlantic University's College of Engineering and Computer Science. They have developed a technique using machine learning - a sub-field of artificial intelligence (AI) - that will enhance computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) of melanoma. Thanks to the algorithm they created - which can be used in mobile apps that are being developed to diagnose suspicious moles - they were able to determine the "sweet spot" in classifying images of skin lesions.

    This new finding, published in the Journal of Digital Imaging, will ultimately help clinicians more reliably identify and diagnose melanoma skin lesions, distinguishing them from other types of skin lesions. The research was conducted in the NSF Industry/University Cooperative Research Center for Advanced Knowledge Enablement (CAKE) at FAU and was funded by the Center's industry members.

    Melanoma is a particularly deadly form of skin cancer when left undiagnosed. In the United States alone, there were an estimated 76,380 new cases of melanoma and an estimated 6,750 deaths due to melanoma in 2016. Malignant melanoma and benign skin lesions often appear very similar to the untrained eye. Over the years, dermatologists have developed different heuristic classification methods to diagnose melanoma, but to limited success (65 to 80 percent accuracy). As a result, computer scientists and doctors have teamed up to develop CADx tools capable of aiding physicians to classify skin lesions, which could potentially save numerous lives each year.

    "Contemporary CADx systems are powered by deep learning architectures, which basically consist of a method used to train computers to perform an intelligent task. We feed them massive amounts of data so that they can learn to extract meaning from the data and, eventually, demonstrate performance comparable to human experts - dermatologists in this case," said Oge Marques, Ph.D., lead author of the study and a professor in FAU's Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science who specializes in machine cognition, medical imaging and health care technologies. "We are not trying to replace physicians or other medical professionals with artificial intelligence. We are trying to help them solve a problem faster and with greater accuracy, in other words enabling augmented intelligence."

    Images of skin lesions often contain more than just skin lesions - background noise, hair, scars, and other artifacts in the image can potentially confuse the CADx system. To prevent the classifier from incorrectly associating these irrelevant artifacts with melanoma, the images are segmented into two parts, separating the lesion from the surrounding skin, hoping that the segmented lesion can be more easily analyzed and classified.

    "Previous studies have produced conflicting results: some research suggests that segmentation improves classification while other research suggests that segmentation is detrimental, due to a loss of contextual information around the lesion area," said Marques. "How much we segment an image can either help or impede skin lesion classification."

    With that in mind, Marques and his collaborators Borko Furht, Ph.D., a professor in FAU's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science and director of the NSF-sponsored CAKE at FAU; Jack Burdick, a second-year master's student at FAU; and Janet Weinthal, an undergraduate student at FAU, tested their hypothesis: "How much segmentation is too much?"

    To test their hypothesis, the researchers first compared the effects of no segmentation, full segmentation, and partial segmentation on classification and demonstrated that partial segmentation led to the best results. They then proceeded to determine how much segmentation would be "just right." To do that, they used three degrees of partial segmentation, investigating how a variable-sized non-lesion border around the segmented skin lesion affects classification results. They performed comparisons in a systematic and reproducible manner to demonstrate empirically that a certain amount of segmentation border around the lesion could improve classification performance.

    Their findings suggest that extending the border beyond the lesion to include a limited amount of background pixels improves their classifier's ability to distinguish melanoma from a benign skin lesion.

    "Our experimental results suggest that there appears to be a 'sweet spot' in the degree to which the surrounding skin included is neither too great nor too small and provides a 'just right' amount of context," said Marques.

    Their method showed an improvement across all relevant measures of performance for a skin lesion classifier.
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Acral melanoma foot lesions. Part 2: clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management.
    Desai A et al
    Clin Exp Dermatol. 2017 Dec 13. doi: 10.1111/ced.13323.
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Immediate Reconstruction for Plantar Melanoma: A Paradigm Shift.
    Oliver-Allen H, Piper M, Vaughn C, Sbitany H.
    Ann Plast Surg. 2017 May;78(5 Suppl 4):S194-S198. doi: 10.1097/SAP.0000000000001115.
     
  13. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Surgical Management of Plantar Melanoma: A Retrospective Study in One Center
    Min Wang et al
    JFAS: April 06, 2018
     
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    PUBLIC RELEASE: 25-APR-2018
    Targeting telomerase as therapeutic strategy for melanoma
    Combination therapy co-targeting the mitochondria enhances the antitumor effect of telomerase inhibition in NRAS-mutant melanoma


    PHILADELPHIA -- (April 25, 2018) -- Targeting telomerase was effective at killing NRAS-mutant melanoma cells, and the impact was further enhanced when the strategy was paired with an inhibitor of mitochondrial function, according to study results by The Wistar Institute published in Oncogene.

    "Many melanoma patients do not benefit from new treatment options or experience disease progression because of resistance. Our research advances the search for novel therapeutic strategies to treat NRAS-mutant melanoma, which is highly resistant to most therapies and associated with poor prognosis," said lead researcher Jessie Villanueva, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Molecular & Cellular Oncogenesis Program at Wistar.

    Targeting NRAS as well as the other oncogenes of the Ras family has proven extremely challenging, according to Villanueva, and researchers have resorted to searching for vulnerabilities in NRAS-mutant cancer cells that can provide alternative therapeutic targets.

    Mutations in the regulatory element of the TERT gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase, are found in more than 70 percent of melanomas. Telomerase is an enzyme that protects the integrity of chromosome ends during replication and represents a promising target for cancer therapy because it is absent in most normal adult cells while its reactivation in malignant cells allows continuous cell divisions.

    "We linked the presence of mutant NRAS to TERT expression and showed that NRAS mutant melanoma cells are highly dependent on telomerase," said Villanueva. "We also demonstrated the therapeutic value of exploiting this dependency by inducing telomere dysfunction, which caused cell death selectively in NRAS mutant cells and not in normal cells that do not express telomerase."

    Villanueva and colleagues studied the consequence of NRAS depletion on gene expression in NRAS-mutant melanoma cells, focusing on genes that regulate proliferation. They observed a strong decrease in expression of TERT. They then inhibited telomerase activity via TERT gene silencing or induced telomere dysfunction through a telomerase substrate, called 6-thio-dG; both interventions led to extensive cell death and DNA damage. They also observed an increase in expression of several enzymes involved in the function of mitochondria, the organelles designated to energy production, suggesting that following telomere dysfunction cells put in place an adaptive metabolic response that helps them cope with the damage.

    "We asked whether inhibition of mitochondrial function could synergize with the anti-melanoma effects of telomere dysfunction," said Patricia Reyes-Uribe, a research assistant in the Villanueva Lab and the first author of the study. "We found that the mitochondrial inhibitor gamitrinib enhances the cytotoxic effects of TERT depletion or 6-thio-dG selectively in NRAS mutant tumor cells."

    These observations were reproduced in vivo in a mouse model of NRAS-mutant melanoma by showing that the combination of gamitrinib and 6-thio-dG reduced tumor size and substantially prolonged survival.

    "Our work provides proof-of-principle that we can successfully address drug resistance by developing combination therapies that simultaneously impair telomerase and block adaptive resistance mechanisms," added Villanueva.
     
  15. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Acral Lentiginous Melanoma Is Associated with Certain Poor Prognostic Histopathological Factors but May Not be Correlated with Nodal Involvement, Recurrence, and a Worse Survival.
    Tas F, Erturk K.
    Pathobiology. 2018 Jun 1:1-5.
     
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