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New falls guidelines

Discussion in 'Gerontology' started by NewsBot, Sep 1, 2012.

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  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Press Release:
    New physio guidelines for the elderly at risk of falls
    Link to guidelines
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

    Falls in older adults

    Falls in older adults are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and are an important class of preventable injuries. The cause of falling in old age is often multifactorial, and may require a multidisciplinary approach both to treat any injuries sustained and to prevent future falls.[1] Falls include dropping from a standing position, or from exposed positions such as those on ladders or stepladders. The severity of injury is generally related to the height of the fall. The state of the ground surface onto which the victim falls is also important, harder surfaces causing more severe injury. Falls can be prevented by ensuring that carpets are tacked down, that objects like electric cords are not in one's path, that hearing and vision are optimized, dizziness is minimized, alcohol intake is moderated and that shoes have low heels or rubber soles.[2]

    A review of clinical trial evidence by the European Food Safety Authority led to a recommendation that people over age 60 years should supplement the diet with vitamin D to reduce the risk of falling and bone fractures.[3] Falls are an important aspect of geriatric medicine.

    1. ^ Cite error: The named reference Sarofim was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
    2. ^ Chang, Huan J. (2010-01-20). "Falls and older adults". JAMA. 303 (3): 288. doi:10.1001/jama.303.3.288. ISSN 0098-7484. PMID 20085959.
    3. ^ Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (2011). "Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to vitamin D and risk of falling pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006". EFSA Journal. EFSA Journal 2011;9(9):2382 [18 pp.]. 9 (9). doi:10.2903/j.efsa.2011.2382.CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link)
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Interventions for preventing falls in older people living in the community.
    Gillespie LD, Robertson MC, Gillespie WJ, Sherrington C, Gates S, Clemson LM, Lamb SE.
    Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012 Sep 12;9:CD007146.
    t
     
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