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Should We Abandon The Concept Of The Subtalar Neutral Joint Position?

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by Petcu Daniel, Jan 8, 2020.

  1. Brian A. Rothbart

    Brian A. Rothbart Active Member

    The answer to your question is a matter of opinion and clinical experience. To my knowledge, to date, there are no definitive double blind studies to answer your question.

    In my clinical experience joint congruity is an important diagnostic tool to determine the type and strength of the proprioceptive signal being generated in the foot and sent to the cerebellum.
    1. If the STJ is compacted (e.g., relative to joint congruity, frequently referred to as pronated), the proprioceptive signal to the cerebellum is distorted, resulting in a distorted posture, which frequently results in chronic musculoskeletal pain. Typically this type of distorted posture is linked to an anteverted pelvis.
    2. If the STJ is loosely packed (e.g., relative to joint congruity, frequently referred to as supinated), the proprioceptive signal to the cerebellum is also distorted, resulting in a distorted posture, which again can result in chronic musculoskeletal pain. Typically this type of distorted posture is linked to a retroverted pelvis.
    Thus it can be appreciated why STJ congruity is an important diagnostic tool when dealing with postural distortions.
     
  2. markjohconley

    markjohconley Well-Known Member

    country of training, please, mark
     
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