Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

Tai chi and core muscle stability

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by PowerPodiatry, Feb 28, 2012.

Tags:
  1. PowerPodiatry

    PowerPodiatry Active Member


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    This may tie in with the barefoot running debate...in the way that sometimes the simple things need to be relearnt.

    One of the comments I have noticed in a few of the treads has been the need for people to 'learn to run'...and the replies that they should know how to run by now.

    One thing i have noticed as a Tai chi instructor and with various international discussion groups is that some people have trouble doing what should be a natural movement.
    Now we teach Tai chi at a very advanced level...not your regular Grandmother Tai chi and we find that due to poor core muscle stability we have to reeducate to achieve 'natural' movement.
    It would be interesting to test core muscle stabiltiy in relation to running injuries...maybe it has been done and I'm unaware of it...poor scholar that I am.

    Tai chi taught correctly is a great tool for assisting the patient develop core strength...but sadly the level of instructors is very poor with many doing weekend workshop to become instructor for things like 'Tai chi for Arthritis'.:bash:
    It is just another tool I use to try and engage my patients to participate in their own health.
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

    Effect of tai chi on body balance: randomized controlled trial in elderly men with dizziness
    Maciaszek J, Osinski W.
    Am J Chin Med. 2012;40(2):245-53.
     
  3. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

    Related threads:
    Other threads tagged with Tai chi
     
  4. PowerPodiatry

    PowerPodiatry Active Member

    Thanks for that Admin2

    I discussed this in a recent Falls prevention round table for one of the Padman Aged care facilities.

    WHO also supports Tai Chi for falls prevention but finds that it needs to be implemented early rather than later with the efficacy diminishing with the "Frail Aged".

    Like most things there are "Real" Tai chi instructors and those that do a quickie weekend course. Understanding Biomechanics assists me when I teach Tai Chi...and we integrate it into the clinical environment.

    Ciao for Now
    Colin
     
  5. Sicknote

    Sicknote Active Member

    Don't many foot & knee problems originate from the hip/pelvic region?.
     
  6. davidh

    davidh Podiatry Arena Veteran

    Interesting thread PP.

    Sicknote. This is a view I have come across quite a lot.
    I think it is incorrect.

    I believe that most foot and knee problems in fact come from the combined pelvis and lower limb/foot geometry makeup (+ age + workload obviously).
     
  7. Sicknote

    Sicknote Active Member

    Yes, the pelvic/pelvis region.

    Shouldn't this thread be 10 pages long by now?.

    Or is this just another classic case of treat the problem but not the root cause?.
     
  8. davidh

    davidh Podiatry Arena Veteran

    You didn't read my post properly:rolleyes:.
     
  9. Sicknote

    Sicknote Active Member

    And you still haven't grasped mine.
     
  10. efuller

    efuller MVP

    Yes, in the sense that the force of gravity acting on the trunk and contralateral leg, that is in swing phase, will load the foot that is on the ground. Did you have some other mechanism in mind?

    Eric
     
  11. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Press Release:
    Tai Chi exercise may reduce falls in adult stroke survivors
     
  12. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Complexity-based measures inform tai chi's impact on standing postural control in older adults with peripheral neuropathy.
    Manor B, Lipsitz LA, Wayne PM, Peng CK, Li L.
    BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013 Apr 16;13(1):87.
     
  13. Jo BB

    Jo BB Active Member

    Hi,
    Goldpods had a visiting orthopaedic specialising in hip and knee surgery last week.Dr.Liu commented that he did advise patients investigate and practice improving there core strength prior to surgery- there was a possibility this would manage or alleviate symptoms.
    My limited understanding of biomechanics, orthotic therapy and core strength is they go hand in hand.
    Maybe that is why barefoot runners/walkers benefit, smaller stride length placing less force through the lower limb?
    Has any one else been noticing the difficulty in patient's abilty to purchase shoe wear that actually accommodates width? I don't know if it is just a Qld / Gold Coast problem, a DM T2 thing but I have too many patient's with extra width issues.
    Cheers,
    JoBB
     
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effectiveness of Tai-Chi for Decreasing Acute Pain in Fibromyalgia Patients.
    Segura-Jiménez V, Romero-Zurita A, Carbonell-Baeza A, Aparicio VA, Ruiz JR, Delgado-Fernández M.
    Int J Sports Med. 2013 Nov 7.
     
  15. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    A randomized controlled trial of patient-reported outcomes with tai chi exercise in Parkinson's disease.
    Li F, Harmer P, Liu Y, Eckstrom E, Fitzgerald K, Stock R, Chou LS.
    Mov Disord. 2013 Dec 29. doi: 10.1002/mds.25787.
     
  16. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Press Release:
    Can Tai Chi slow the aging process?
    Tai Chi intervention increases number of CD34+ cells in young adults
     
  17. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Comparative Impacts of Tai Chi, Balance Training, and a Specially-Designed Yoga Program on Balance in Older Fallers
    Meng Ni, BS, Kiersten Mooney, BS, Luca Richards, BA, Anoop Balachandran, MS, Mingwei Sun, BA, Kysha Harriell, PhD, Melanie Potiaumpai, BS, MS, Joseph F. Signorile, PhDemail
    Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; Volume 95, Issue 9, Pages 1620–1628.e30, September 2014
     
  18. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM TAI CHI EXERCISE ON BALANCE CONTROL IN OLDER ADULTS
    Wei-ping Li, Shu-wan Chang, Ji-he Zhou, You-lian Hong, Yan Cong, Mei-qin Qin, Cui Zhang
    International Conference of Biomechanics in Sports (2014)
     
  19. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    THE INFLUENCE OF TAI-CHI EXERCISE ON DYNAMICS OF LOWER EXTREMITY FOR THE ELDERLY DURING SIT-TO-STAND
    Chung-Lin Wu, Chen-Fu Huang, Po-Chieh Chen
    International Conference of Biomechanics in Sports (2014)
     
  20. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    A randomized controlled trial: Preoperative home-based combined Tai Chi and Strength Training (TCST) to improve balance and aerobic capacity in patients with total hip arthroplasty (THA)
    Runming Zeng, Jing Lin, Shengrong Wu, Lihan Chen, Shuxian Chen, Hanxiong Gao, Yongyi Zheng, Huanlin Ma
    Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics; Article in Press
     
  21. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 22, 2016
  22. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The effect of Tai Chi on four chronic conditions—cancer, osteoarthritis, heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review and meta-analyses
    Press Release
    Yi-Wen Chen et al
    Br J Sports Med doi:10.1136/bjsports-2014-094388
     
  23. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Press Release:
    Tai Chi Found to Be as Effective as Physical Therapy for Knee Osteoarthritis
     
  24. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Tai Chi to Promote Balance Training
    Rogers, Carol E.
    Annual Review of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Volume 36, Number 1, 2016, pp. 229-249(21)
     
  25. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    PUBLIC RELEASE: 11-MAR-2016
    Practicing tai chi reduces risk of falling in older adults
     
  26. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    7
  27. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Simplified Tai Chi Program Training versus Traditional Tai
    Chi on the Functional Movement Screening in Older Adults

    Huiru Wang et al
    source
     
  28. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effects of therapeutic Tai chi on functional fitness and activities of daily living in patients with Parkinson disease.
    Choi HJ
    J Exerc Rehabil. 2016 Oct 31;12(5):499-503. eCollection 2016.
     
  29. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effects of 12 Weeks of Tai Chi Chuan Training on Balance and Functional Fitness in Older Japanese Adults.
    Takeshima, N.; Islam, M.M.; Kato, Y.; Koizumi, D.; Narita, M.; Rogers, N.L.; Rogers, M.E.
    Sports 2017, 5, 32.
     
  30. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    PUBLIC RELEASE: 24-JUL-2017
    Tai chi may help prevent falls in older and at-risk adults
    An analysis of published studies indicates that tai chi may help reduce the number of falls in both the older adult population and at-risk adults. The findings, which are published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, offer a simple and holistic way to prevent injuries.

    Tai chi is an ancient Chinese practice focused on flexibility and whole body coordination that promotes harmonized motion in space. Previous research has shown that tai chi is an effective exercise to improve balance control and flexibility in older individuals. This suggests that the practice might help protect against falls, which are a primary cause of traumatic death for older adults.

    To investigate, Rafael Lomas-Vega, PhD of the University of Jaén in Spain and his colleagues searched the medical literature for relevant studies. The team identified 10 randomized controlled trials analysing the effect of tai chi versus other treatments (such as physical therapy and low intensity exercise) on risk of falls in at-risk and older adults.

    There was high-quality evidence that tai chi significantly reduced the rate of falls by 43% compared with other interventions at short-term follow-up (less than 12 months) and by 13% at long-term follow-up (more than 12 months). Regarding injurious falls, there was some evidence that tai chi reduced risk by 50% over the short term and by 28% over the long term. Tai chi did not seem to influence when an older or at-risk adult was likely to experience their first injurious fall.

    "Tai chi practice may be recommended to prevent falls in at-risk adults and older adults. The length of the interventions ranged from 12 to 26 weeks. The frequency of the 1-hour sessions ranged from one to three times per week," said Dr. Lomas-Vega. "Due to the small number of published studies, further research is needed to investigate the effect of tai chi on injurious falls and time to first fall."https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28733376?dopt=Abstract
     
  31. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Kinetics of the lower limb during two typical Tai Chi movements in the elderly.
    Li JX, Law NY
    Res Sports Med. 2017 Oct 25:1-12. doi: 10.1080/15438627.2017.1393753
     
  32. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Balance and Functional Outcomes for Older Community-Dwelling Adults Who Practice Tai Chi and Those Who Do Not: A Comparative Study.
    Bubela D, Sacharko L, Chan J, Brady M.
    J Geriatr Phys Ther. 2017 Nov 9. doi: 10.1519/JPT.0000000000000153
     
  33. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Long-term Effects of Tai Chi on Muscle Strength
    and Physical Function in Patients with Peripheral
    Neuropathy

    Arturo A. Arce-Esquivel, Joyce E. Ballard, FACSM, Melinda
    L. Hermanns, Linda R. Rath, Brittany Murley, Yong T. Wang,
    Presented at ACSM mtg, 2018
     
  34. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Long-term Tai Chi Practitioners Have Superior Body Stability under Dual Task Condition during Stair Ascent
    Qipeng Song et al
    Gait and Posture; Articles in Press
     
  35. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effects of tai chi on postural control during dual-task stair negotiation in knee osteoarthritis: a randomised controlled trial protocol.
    Wang X et al
    BMJ Open. 2020 Jan 2;10(1):e033230
     
  36. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    NEWS RELEASE 11-FEB-2020
    Can T'ai Chi alleviate chronic low back pain in older adults?
    MARY ANN LIEBERT, INC./GENETIC ENGINEERING NEWS
    New Rochelle, NY, February 11, 2020--A new study evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of using T'ai Chi to improve chronic low back pain in adults over 65 years of age compared to health education and usual care. The results of this randomized controlled trial are published in JACM, the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, dedicated to paradigm, practice, and policy advancing integrative health. Click here to read this article free on the JACM website through March 11, 2020.

    T'ai Chi has been shown effective for improving chronic back pain yet with little attention to older adults. For this study researchers Karen Sherman, PhD and colleagues from Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute and University of Washington, Seattle, focused only on adults older than 65. They present their study design and findings in the article entitled "T'ai Chi for Chronic Low Back Pain in Older Adults: A Feasibility Trial."

    Participants were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of T'ai Chi, a 12-week health education intervention, or usual care. Measures of recruitment and retention contributed to the determination of feasibility. The findings indicate that the study was feasible and had acceptable recruitment, few dropouts, and an excellent safety profile. Among the T'ai Chi participants, 62% attended at least 70% of the classes during the 12-week intervention period. Remarkably, at 52 weeks, 70% of T'ai Chi participants reported having practiced the week before, with a median of 3 days per week and 15 minutes/session. Both participation and perception of helpfulness were lower in the health education group.

    "More research is needed on treatments for chronic low back pain in older adults," Dr. Sherman summarizes. "Our study showed that it's feasible to do a clinical trial of T'ai Chi for this condition."

    JACM Editor-in-Chief John Weeks, johnweeks-integrator.com, Seattle, WA, states: "Many of us have become familiar with pictures of large groups of older people in China or Hong Kong practicing T'ai Chi together. Dr. Sherman's work suggests that older adults here in the United States may similarly find such practices acceptable and useful."
     
Loading...

Share This Page