Welcome to the Podiatry Arena forums

You are currently viewing our podiatry forum as a guest which gives you limited access to view all podiatry discussions and access our other features. By joining our free global community of Podiatrists and other interested foot health care professionals you will have access to post podiatry topics (answer and ask questions), communicate privately with other members, upload content, view attachments, receive a weekly email update of new discussions, access other special features. Registered users do not get displayed the advertisements in posted messages. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our global Podiatry community today!

  1. Everything that you are ever going to want to know about running shoes: Running Shoes Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Have you considered the Critical Thinking and Skeptical Boot Camp, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Have you considered the Clinical Biomechanics Boot Camp Online, for taking it to the next level? See here for more.
Dismiss Notice
Have you liked us on Facebook to get our updates? Please do. Click here for our Facebook page.
Dismiss Notice
Do you get the weekly newsletter that Podiatry Arena sends out to update everybody? If not, click here to organise this.

What percentage do private clinics pay their podiatry associates

Discussion in 'Practice Management' started by healthyfeet, Jul 10, 2014.

  1. healthyfeet

    healthyfeet Active Member


    Members do not see these Ads. Sign Up.
    What percentage do private clinics pay their podiatry associates? Assume that all instruments and materials are provided as well as receptionist cover.
    Thanks for any feed back guys
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. petermac

    petermac Member

    Recently a clinic I work at came under new management. I am on 40% less costs. For example if I earn the clinic $100 and it costs $20 to see the pt I get 40% of the $80 = $32.

    I graduated in 2006 and to be honest feel that this was not a good arrangement - so i started my own practice. Originally with the old owner I was on 50% less costs which I found much fairer considering the experience I have and the fact that I had been at the clinic since I graduated. I think a new grad should start at 40% then move up to 50% within about 3-5 years depending on skill etc.

    Just my 2c worth.
     
  4. Elizabeth Humble-Thomas

    Elizabeth Humble-Thomas Active Member

    Hi there, I have had self employed colleagues working at my one chair practice for 25 years.
    First you need to work out the cost of running the practice per session. To do this, add up all- the overheads; materials, rent,receptionist, heating etc - try to do this first for a month (4 week) period; now divide that sum by the number of sessions worked. This should give you an average cost per session; now divide the session by the number of patients treated (a newly qualified colleague may work at a slower rate).
    First, make sure that the amount you take covers the cost of treatment per patient, then decide how greedy you want to be!
    I decided that the best way to encourage my associates, to give them a good income, and encourage their loyalty, was to pay them 60% of their takings and take 40% for me (i.e. the practice)
    As long as your treatment fee is realistic this should cover costs, and give you a nice little profit - also your colleagues will feel appreciated and not grumpy that they pay you' most of what they slave for!"
    hope this helps
     
  5. healthyfeet

    healthyfeet Active Member

    Does anyone pay commission on any sold consumables or orthoses for example? I mean on top of the 40%, 50% or 60%
     
  6. drsarbes

    drsarbes Well-Known Member

    "Does anyone pay commission on any sold consumables or orthoses for example? I mean on top of the 40%, 50% or 60%"

    Not sure where you are from, but in the US an physician independent contractor cannot receive money for durable goods he/she has ordered that are in turn owned by the company he is working for. In addition, one cannot "fee split" or receive a "commission" for selling such items.

    You can get around this by setting up a monetary bonus type system that will reward you for generating income for the practice. A hospital, for instance, will choose to give monetary payment to physicians in a large clinic that are utilizing the hospital services (tests, O.R., etc...) My understanding of this is that there cannot be an exact relationship between the actual $$$ amount the hospital may be receiving from this utilization and the amount paid to these providers.

    Steve
     
Loading...

Share This Page