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Would changing gait pattern decrease your likelihood of running injuries?

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Apr 7, 2016.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Press Release:
    April 06, 2016
    Would changing gait pattern decrease your likelihood of running injuries?
     
  2. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    This is the paper refered to in teh press release:
    Orthopaedic Perspective on Barefoot and Minimalist Running
    Roth, Jonathan MD; Neumann, Julie MD; Tao, Matthew MD
    Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: March 2016 - Volume 24 - Issue 3 - p 180–187
     
  3. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    I don't think so...

    Interest in barefoot running has fallen back to the level that it was before Born to Run was published.

    Sales of minimalist running shoes was languishing at around 2 or 3% of the run speciality market; my latest attempt to get the figures was greeted with a 'they barely even rate'

    That is not an emerging phenomenon, that's an epic fail. Barefoot and minimalism failed to deliver on the promises from the rhetoric and propaganda and runners have voted with their feet. The science eventually showed that the rhetoric and propaganda was just that ... rhetoric and propaganda.
     
  4. Good for some bad for others

    N = 1 and at this stage we have no way of predicting outcomes of different shoe and or gait combinations

    1 day just not yet
     
  5. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Exactly; there are no net or systematic benefits and the risk of injury during the transition is high, so why bother?
     
  6. David Smith

    David Smith Well-Known Member

    Would changing gait pattern decrease your likelihood of running injuries?

    Its a bit of a non starter as a question - it like asking would changing you hair style make people like you more or would driving a different car cause less accidents resulting in injury.
     
  7. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    The key is that the net or systematic answer is no. The injury rates between all the different running techniques are the same. There are no differences, so there are no net or systematic benefits of running any one particular way.

    However, if you have a history of injury running a particular way, then changing may reduce that risk (or it may increase it) ... it is all going to be individual.
     
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