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Chronic ankle instability and the intrinsic foot muscles

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by scotfoot, Jan 25, 2020.

  1. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member


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    Interesting paper on treating chronic ankle instability . See abstract and link to paper below .

    Abstract

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of a 6-week intrinsic foot muscle exercise program on the activation of intrinsic foot muscle movement and dynamic balance in adults with chronic ankle stability. A total of 30 adults with chronic ankle instability were recruited. The participants were randomly assigned to a group performing intrinsic foot muscle exercises and a control group doing no exercises. We measured the activation rate and dynamic balance of the abductor hallucis, flexor digitorum brevis, flexor hallucis brevis, and quadratus plantae before and after the intervention. We found that the activation rate and dynamic balance significantly increased in all intrinsic foot muscles in the experimental group. These results suggest that intrinsic foot muscle exercise for patients with chronic ankle stability is an effective treatment for improving the functions and balance ability of the intrinsic foot muscles.

    www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov › pmc › articles › PMC6834706
    Effects of a 6-week intrinsic foot muscle exercise program on ...

    by DR Lee - ‎2019 - ‎Related articles28 Oct 2019 - A total of 30 adults with chronic ankle instability were recruited. ... These results suggest that intrinsic foot muscle exercise for patients with chronic ankle stability is an effective treatment for improving the functions and balance ability of theintrinsic foot muscles.
     
  2. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    Here is the conclusion from another paper on the subject of ankle instability and the intrinsics .

    Conclusions

    These results suggest that short foot exercises are more effective in providing intrinsic foot muscle training for patients with pronated feet among chronic ankle sprain patients. Furthermore, short foot exercises may be used to provide ankle stability.

    Paper

    The effect of intrinsic foot muscle training on medial ...

    by KA Chung - ‎2016 - ‎Cited by 4 - ‎Related articles30 Jun 2016 - Kyoung A Chunga, Eunsang Leeb, and Seungwon Lee ... Of ankle sprains, an inversion sprain was reported to account for more than 85% [2], ...
     
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