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Cupping for plantar fasciitis

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, May 20, 2017.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Dry cupping for plantar fasciitis: a randomized
    controlled trial

    Weiqing Ge et al
    J. Phys. Ther. Sci. 29: 859–862, 2017
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Not plantar fasciitis, but cupping:

    THE THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS OF DRY CUPPING ON ILIOTIBIAL BAND TIGHTNESS
    Madeline Marie Biehl
    Masters Thesis; Illinois State University 2017
     
  4. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    No, no and no. Next.
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Press Release: 13-FEB-2018
    Is cupping therapy effective among athletes?
    New Rochelle, NY, February 13, 2018--Swimmer Michael Phelps's continued dominance at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics was accompanied by worldwide awareness of cupping. Cupping therapy has re-emerged as a potential approach to boost post-exercise metabolic recovery, reduce pain, and improve range of motion by increasing local microcirculation. But what does science tell us about the effectiveness or safety of cupping? A new systematic review that examines the results of eleven clinical trials encompassing nearly 500 participants is published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (JACM), a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on JACM website until March 13, 2018.

    Romy Lauche, University of Technology (Sydney, Australia) and colleagues from Endeavour College of Natural Health (Fortitude Valley, Australia) and University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany) coauthored the article entitled "Effects of Cupping Therapy in Amateur and Professional Athletes -- Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials." Despite some reports of benefits, including some related to reduced pain and disability, the authors found the reports uneven and found a high risk of bias in the trial designs. They therefore determined that no conclusive recommendations for or against the value of cupping in sports performance can be made until further trials are carried out.

    Co-author Lauche states: "Cupping therapy is a classic example in which research lags behind clinical practice. We are confident that this review will point out the need for and encourage further high-quality research of cupping, a therapy which has been around for millennia."

    "This systematic review by Lauche and her international team squarely place this therapy in evidence limbo," says JACM Editor-in-Chief John Weeks, johnweeks-integrator.com, Seattle, WA. He adds: "There is evidence here for advocates, evidence for detractors, and evidence for researchers - that we need more of it!"
     
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