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Does medially deviated STJ axis mean significant supination resistance

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by markjohconley, Jun 11, 2007.

  1. markjohconley

    markjohconley Well-Known Member


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    I thought that the more a STJ axis (transverse plane reflection) is laterally deviated the less the supination resistance perceived at the navicular. If so in what pathologies/anomalies would manifest with a laterally deviated STJ axis and a significant supination resistance? Or is it i need a lot more practice before i trust my judgement, any advice appreciated, mark c
     
  2. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
  3. markjohconley

    markjohconley Well-Known Member

    thanks craig , $1.46 all-blacks for the wc, i've invested
     
  4. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    I'll take that, after thrashing France at the weekend:
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Mark:

    The more laterally deviated the subtalar joint (STJ) axis, the less will be the supination resistance force using the supination resistance test (Kirby KA, Green DR: Evaluation and Nonoperative Management of Pes Valgus, pp. 295-327, in DeValentine, S.(ed), Foot and Ankle Disorders in Children. Churchill-Livingstone, New York, 1992). Since feet with laterally deviated STJ axes will have more STJ supination moment from ground reaction force (GRF), then they will tend to have symptoms caused by these abnormal STJ moments, such as chronic inversion ankle sprains and peroneal tendinopathy. In addition, many individuals with more significant laterally deviated STJ axis feet use the peroneal muscles tonically during simple relaxed bipedal stance to increase the STJ pronation moment just so these individuals can keep the forefoot plantigrade (i.e. keep the forefoot on the ground so that the foot is not supinating onto the lateral forefoot only). Because of this relatively common peroneal activation in these individuals, it may be more to difficult supinate their feet using the supination resistance test due to the concomitant peroneal contractile activity. Sometimes, by having the patient first supinate and pronate the foot fully before the test and then watching for peroneal tendon tension from posterior during the test, a more reliable supination resistance test can be achieved in these individuals.
     
  6. DaVinci

    DaVinci Well-Known Member

    Paynie - big difference to the last time they supported the All Blacks:

    [​IMG]

    Go Wallabies! They thrashed Fiji. Bring on the World Cup.
     
  7. markjohconley

    markjohconley Well-Known Member

    Thankyou Kevin, excellent

    (and gorgeous little AUSSIE you've got there Mr Payne)
     
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