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Elastic energy return from the plantar fascia when running

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Feb 23, 2016.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Elastic energy within the human plantar aponeurosis contributes to arch shortening during the push-off phase of running
    Justin C. Wager, , John H. Challis
    Journal of Biomechanics; 17 February 2016
     
  2. efuller

    efuller MVP

    The last line is interesting. It almost looks as if the reviewer made them add it in. However, they should have gone a little farther. When you look at joint power, you are looking at moment produced by all structures that cross the joint. They appear to be making the assumption that all power absorption is done by the platnar fascia and not any of the other structures. If any muscle absorbed any of the energy of arch flattening, a greater percentage of that energy could be lost as heat. Also later in the gait cycle arch rise could be caused by contraction of muscles that cross the arch and not necessarily from elastic energy in the plantar fascia. If I recall correctly, there are EMG studies showing that intrinsic muscles are active in the midstance period of gait. You would think that there is some contribution to arch rise from muscular contraction.

    Joint power is a very powerful tool. However, you can't go beyond the limitations of the measurements. You can know there is a net joint moment causing plantar flexion. You cannot know how much each structure contributes to the net joint moment. (Power = joint moment x angular velocity).

    Eric
     
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