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Gellets or gillette modification for foot orthotic?

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by footdoctor, Jan 15, 2013.

  1. footdoctor

    footdoctor Active Member


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    Had a recent request to manufacture an orthotic with a Gellets modification added.

    Anybody know what a Gellets modification is?

    I believe it is an external post of some sort but cant find any literature on it?

    Could it be a mispelling of the gillettes modification by chance?

    Scott
     
  2. Craig Payne

    Craig Payne Moderator

    Articles:
    6
    Re: gellets modification

    In the context of foot orthoses, there is the "gellet" joint which is a particular type of hinge used in an AFO - I assume it is not that.

    The 'Gillette' modification is something a bit vaguer. It is a modification to an AFO in which there is a flat buttress or outflare to increase medial and stability. Maybe in the context of foot orthoses, they requesting an outflare to the heel post? However, it is a term that is very uncommonly used (I have not heard it used for years).

    I suspect it is a mis-spelling of the term.

    Can you ask them and come back and tell us?
     
  3. "The Gillette foot orthosis is a modified polypropylene orthosis using a medial outrigger on the heel to seat the orthosis more firmly in the shoe and develop a stronger molding on the navicular and calcaneus. "

    Basically, the Gillette modification is a UCBL orthosis with a rearfoot post and medial flare on that rearfoot post.:drinks
     
  4. footdoctor

    footdoctor Active Member

    Craig and kevin,thanks for your help.

    I will contact the practitioner again to get clarification.

    It appears from the photo that Kevin posted that the flare is applied to the positive.

    Interestingly, the customer has requested a rather large medial skive, surely this would negate the medial heel dressing on the positive?

    Tell to get on the phone....

    Scott
     
  5. Scott:

    Those aren't positive casts in the photo, they are foot orthoses.
     
  6. footdoctor

    footdoctor Active Member

    Kevin,

    Poor image viewed on i.phone, looked cast like :eek:

    Would I be right in saying the positive cast is modified to create a medial flare to the heel portion of the shell?

    Or is it simply a extended hemi post with a straight grind?


    Scott
     
  7. Scott:

    Why don't you try reading the article first.
     
  8. footdoctor

    footdoctor Active Member

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