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How much force is generated from abs in a hanging leg raise?

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by Trooper149, Apr 13, 2020.

  1. Trooper149

    Trooper149 Welcome New Poster


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    Hi all, not exactly an issue relating to the feet, but having looked at the posts and threads on this forum and the calibre of members, I would seriously appreciate some of your perspectives with regards to this question.

    With this said, here goes:

    Athlete Stats:
    Weight: 75kg
    Height: 1.9kg
    Leg Length: 1.15m
    Length of Hip Girdle to Bottom of Sternum: 0.35m
    Length of Sternum to top of Head: 0.45m
    Weight of both legs together: 29.79kg
    Weight of both legs and the weight of 66% of trunk: 51.3kg

    The Hanging Leg Raise is divided into 2 phases. The 1st phase includes the hip flexors lifting the legs to 90 degrees so they are parallel with the floor. The spine should stay perpendicular with the ground. In phase 2, the abdominals then lift the pelvis complete with the already lifted legs and hip girdle to 45 degrees. Total degree of motion: 135 degrees.

    Some other information that may be useful:
    -the abdominals begin at the base of the sternum and connect onto the lower point of the pelvis.
    -the hip flexors begin in the low back and expand across the top of the pelvis and insert about one third of the way down the thigh.
    -the count tempo for this exercise is 1 second up and 2 seconds down

    To give folk an idea of what the goal is: it is to create a formula (via excel) by which we can calculate the amount of force produced/volume shifted by the abs and hip flexors during the hanging leg raise. Ideally I would like to have a formula which I can simply input someones stats and parameters of the exercise and get a returned value. Most exercises operate as close as possible to ones centre of gravity and utilise external weights.

    E.g. a back squat of 80kg external weight for 5 reps over a duration of 15 seconds. Add in an extra say 30kg of upperbody weight which is also being lifted by the legs. You can quite confidently take 80kg+30kg, multiply by 5 = 550kg of volume and divide by 15 seconds = 36.6kg of volume shifted/force produced per second. Because the body is lined with its centre of gravity, the overall leverage/torque is 0 or negligible.

    With bodyweight training however, you are using the bodys own weight and alot of tension is created by levers. This makes calculating the actual amount of work done, alot more difficult (at least for myself).

    Appreciate any other perspectives. Have included an FBD.

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