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Interventions for preventing lower limb soft-tissue running injuries

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Jul 8, 2011.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Interventions for preventing lower limb soft-tissue running injuries.
    Yeung SS, Yeung EW, Gillespie LD.
    Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011 Jul 6;7:CD001256.
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. DaVinci

    DaVinci Well-Known Member

    Anyone else noticing how increasingly useless Cochrane reviews (and systematic reviews) are becoming for clinical practice decision making? The only people who think they are or should be useful for clinical practice are those that write them and other academics who do not actually work at the coal face of having to make clinical decisions on a daily basis.

    Can anyone actually name a Cochrane review or any other systematic review that is used in or has changed clinical practice?
     
  4. Ian Linane

    Ian Linane Well-Known Member

    Considering that we are constantly bombarded with the best practice being to have to use EBM and that Cochrane is meant to be the super source I suppose a questions to ask is:

    Have Cochrane reviews etc ever been researched as to their benefit to the practising clinician in terms of practical usefulness in choice of treatment in any given podiatric clinic situation.

    Impossible to do I suppose, and it may not be the purpose of Cochrane, but I know very few clinicians, who may well read the various papers, that have expressed to me that they are significant to practical treatment with the patient in front of them.
     
  5. krome

    krome Active Member

    As a person who has written two Cochrane reviews I agree that the clinical perspective is a vital component. Cochrane reviews are very limited as you can only include randomised clinical trials and there is a rich body of evidence that cannot be included.

    However, in a recent review (non-surgical interventions of paediatric pes planus) we have responded to a number of clinicians from the UK, Australia and America. The purpose of the review is to illustrate the lack of evidence and to suggest the best way forward. The review has allowed the authors to put together a strong argument to evaluate the short and long term effects of foot development in children with and without flatfeet.

    We feel this must be a good argument as it will have an impact on clinicians talking to concern parents/guardians about the best way forward for their child based upon current evidence.
     
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