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Leaving podiatry ... advice please !

Discussion in 'General Issues and Discussion Forum' started by Synergy03, Oct 11, 2019.

  1. Synergy03

    Synergy03 Guest


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    Hello everyone !

    I’m new to the forum however I’ve read threads on here for years. The summary is I have a podiatry degree however I no longer wish to work in podiatry. Are there any people on here who are / were in a similar position and could they advise how they put their podiatry degree to use within a new profession? I don’t want the degree to be a waste, however I’m lost as to the career direction I can take.
     
  2. Rob Kidd

    Rob Kidd Well-Known Member

    MMMmmmm. Is this wise, I ask myself. My wife tells me that I do not have any wisdom - she is probably right - but what the hell. After five years of practice, I started teaching pod in Manchester in 1980. I taught pod in two countries until 2000. Along the way I had educated my self into anatomy (PhD - anatomy), and made the transition to anatomy. I was very happy with this, and still teach podiatric anatomy to this day - even though I am meant to be retired. My point is several - the skills you gain in late teens are no longer going to take you to where you finish; we all have to update, transition, and move on. I am a million miles from where I started, but then, so are most people these days. But I will say this: I am a better anatomy lecturer for having first been a podiatrist; I do not ever regret taking podiatry as a first tertiary experience. My point is that the pod course not not a waste - it was the foundation for the future.
     
  3. Brian A. Rothbart

    Brian A. Rothbart Active Member

    I agree with Rob. The DPM degree is a great foundation for future work. I started out with my DPM. Then went on to obtain a PhD in degenerative diseases (cancer) and finally obtained my board certification in Natural Medicine. I used all this experience in my present work as a researcher in the area of chronic musculoskeletal pain.
    Your DPM degree is not a waste. On the contrary, it offers you a great gateway into branching off in many possible ways, depending on your own proclivity.
     
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