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leg stiffness, CNS stimulation and Piper rhythm

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by mike weber, Sep 18, 2010.


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    Bruce William just posted an update from i-FAB on the i-FAB update thread

    I had never heard of a piper Rhythm so went and did some reading. I though maybe those at i-FAB could expand alittle on the subject if they have time.

    I also found this abstract (IG would love a copy if possible) with one of the authors being B Nigg.

    For me leg stiffness (kleg) and CNS control is some that fascinates me and would have love to heard the talk, guess I will have to buy a book in November as well.
     
  2. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Mike,

    Spooky that I returned a few hours ago from a 2 week break in Italy and this was pretty much the first post I read! It's in your email inbox mate.

    And now I'm playing catch up - just another 900 new posts to read since I last logged on...
     
  3. I´ve found some reading on and around Piper rhythms it pretty heavy and will take a few reads for me.

    In leg stiffness discussions we have discussed how changes in the leg stiffness will be controlled by the CNS.

    Running can be modelled as a spring-mass model which will change depending on the foot - surface interface. ie harder surface - decreased leg stiffness . Out of this will come a change in the spring oscillation.

    what Ive got so far:

    A piper rhythm is an oscillation in the muscle -The muscle can also be seen as an individual spring.

    The piper rhythum is belevied to be controlled by the CNS.

    Here some reading - note the abstract re parkinsons.


    Does the frequency content of the surface mechanomyographic
    signal reflect motor unit firing rates? A brief review
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Found this paper which gives a nice discription of a Piper rhythm.

    And goes into different Hrtz rhythms with different contraction force.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Found the full text of the Parkinsons paper re Piper Rhythms
     
  6. Dr. Steven King

    Dr. Steven King Well-Known Member

    Aloha,

    It has been reported that textured ground contact can influence contacts and muscle stiffness as well.

    When I walk across crushed blue lava rock barefooted I walk with a similar gait as when I walk across crushed glass with foam footwear on. Why?

    Does my CNS know something potentially dangerous is afoot and is compensating for it by limiting peak impulses with reduced muscle tone-tuning?

    Mahalo,
    Steve
     
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