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Lunge test equivalent for functional hallux limitus?

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by timharmey, Jun 23, 2011.

  1. timharmey

    timharmey Active Member


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    As the lunge test will look at equinus in terms of "stiffness" under load is there an equivalent test for functional hallux limitus ? or if not should there be ?
     
  2. Griff

    Griff Moderator

    Jacks test
     
  3. timharmey

    timharmey Active Member

    would there be any benefit in the foot not being tested being a stride forward as to replicate the position before toe off ?
     
  4. efuller

    efuller MVP

    It's hard to think of any benefit. If the goal of the test is to compare one foot to another then you want to standardize the conditions as much as possible. With one foot in front of the other it's hard to standardize how much weight is on which foot. It's hard enough to do that with the feet side by side. Then you have to worry about muscular contraction and balance.

    What say you?

    Eric
     
  5. timharmey

    timharmey Active Member

    I was thinking that as you are stridding forward the foot that is being tested approaches toe off , and it is limitation in movement ,or prior to movement that we are intrested in , rather than limitation in movement while standing still?
     
  6. efuller

    efuller MVP

    It would work if you could get them to stand in the same position, with the same muscle activity that they do in gait. There are some people who have an easy to activate windlass who exhibit signs of functional hallux limitus (e.g. ski tip toe aka hyperextension of the 1st IPJ). They usually exhibit late stance phase pronation in gait. I hypothesize that these individuals are using their peroneal muscles to create a pronation moment at that time in gait and this creates the functional limitus in a foot where you would not otherwise expect it.

    On the other hand I would bet that the people who have a difficult windlass will probably have the limited dorsiflexion in gait, unless they choose to supinate their STJ with muscles at heel off in gait.

    Eric
     
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