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Measuring the Primus Metatarsus Supinatus Value

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by Brian A. Rothbart, May 31, 2021.

  1. Brian A. Rothbart

    Brian A. Rothbart Well-Known Member


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    The Primus Metatarsus Supinatus value (PMSv) is a differential test to determine which of the 4 genetic foot structures is present (Rothbart, 2002)

    Measuring PMSv.jpg

    Below the chart linking the PMSv to genetic foot structures

    PMSv vs Foot Structure.jpg


    • Rothbart BA, 2002. Medial Column Foot Systems: An Innovative Tool for Improving Posture. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies (6)1:37-46
     
  2. Brian A. Rothbart

    Brian A. Rothbart Well-Known Member

    Below is an animation of the torsional development of the foot during embryogenesis (Rothbart, 2002). This is an unwinding of the cartilaginous (future osseous) structures of the foot and is not a positional shift in its' developing joints.
    • Carnegie Stage 15: The limb bud first appears as an outgrowth (limb bud)
    • Carnegie Stage 17: The foot plate differentiates from the limb bud, the sole pads (planter surface of the developing feet) are cephalad.
    • Carnegie Stage 19: The foot pads rotate into supinatus where the plantar surfaces of the feet facing one another
    • Carnegie Stage 21: The distal rays (toes) begin to differentiate from the sole pad become clearly visible in Stage 23.
    This unwinding process continues in fetogenesis (prenatal development from the 9th week to birth) until the foot becomes plantargrade (complete resolution of supinatus).

    If this process ends prematurely, it will result in one of the 3 genetic foot structures:
    1. Clubfoot Deformity
    2. PreClinical Clubfoot Deformity
    3. Primus Metatarsus Supinatus foot structure
    depending on when, during fetogenesis, this cartilaginous unwinding stops.

    Cephalad to Supinatus.gif

    • Rothbart BA, 2002. Medial Column Foot Systems: An Innovative Tool for Improving Posture. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies (6)1:37-46
     
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