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Neuromuscular stimulation early after ankle sprain

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Dec 21, 2006.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
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    Effect of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on Ankle Swelling in the Early Period After Ankle Sprain.
    Man IO, Morrissey MC, Cywinski JK.
    Phys Ther. 2006 Dec 19;
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. Iain Johnston

    Iain Johnston Active Member

    We have been using NMES, with a Compex for ankle sprains. it can be applied immediately once it has been established that the type of injury .
    ankle inversion sprains where there is effusion are treated with programmes on the NMES called Capillarisation, and Endorphinic (reduce muscle soreness).
    These a low frequency programs that aid blood flow, reduce swelling somewhat and ease pain. The application can be up to 4 times a day initially . We have found this to help improve quality of ankle motion quite quickly as the swelling reduces.
    Then we move on to rehabilitation of the anterior Tib, and peroneal muscles.
    Of course the usual rest protocols, rest, compression , elevation till the patient can weightbear and move in a straight line. The "ice" component is replace with Compex NMES.
     
  4. Iain Johnston

    Iain Johnston Active Member

    It's been four years now since introducing NMES to the clinic.
    It has become an integral part of rehab in the clinic.
    The NMES can be used to establish muscle effectiveness, and difference in function between two sides. Low level frequency programs, can provide a twitch to the muscle, and invariably the side of complaint will show muscle amnesia. For example the Peroneus Longus, stimulation on a side with a unilateral bunion will show weaker, or less twitch response than the other.
    It becomes apparent that deactivating this muscle would be crucial in aiding footposture and stabilisation of the 1st Ray.
    Alongside other manual therapy techniques, NMES is a valuable tool.
     
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