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Pentoxifylline and wound healing

Discussion in 'Diabetic Foot & Wound Management' started by NewsBot, Dec 12, 2012.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Pentoxifylline improves cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.
    Babaei S, Bayat M, Nouruzian M, Bayat M.
    Eur J Pharmacol. 2012 Dec 3.
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

    Pentoxifylline

    Pentoxifylline, also known as oxpentifylline, is a xanthine derivative used as a drug to treat muscle pain in people with peripheral artery disease.[4] It is generic and sold under many brand names worldwide.[1]

    1. ^ a b Drugs.com drugs.com international listings for Pentoxifylline. Page accessed Feb 1, 206
    2. ^ "PRODUCT INFORMATION TRENTAL® 400" (PDF). TGA eBusiness Services. sanofi-aventis australia pty limited. 25 March 2010. Retrieved 3 February 2014.
    3. ^ a b c "Trental, Pentoxil (pentoxifylline) dosing, indications, interactions, adverse effects, and more". Medscape Reference. WebMD. Retrieved 3 February 2014.
    4. ^ Broderick, Cathryn; Forster, Rachel; Abdel-Hadi, Mohammed; Salhiyyah, Kareem (October 16, 2020). "Pentoxifylline for intermittent claudication". The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 2020 (10): CD005262. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD005262.pub4. ISSN 1469-493X. PMC 8094235. PMID 33063850.
     
  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Pentoxifylline: A New Armamentarium in Diabetic Foot Ulcers
    Venkatesh Rewale, Kiran Ravi Prabhakar, Anjali M. Chitale
    Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research [serial online] 2014 January [cited: 2014 Jan 22 ]; 8:84-86.
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Efficacy and Safety of Pentoxifylline for Venous Leg Ulcers: An Updated Meta-Analysis
    Shi-Yi Sun et al
    Int J Low Extrem Wounds. 2021 Nov 15
     
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