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Plantar fascia loads during forefoot and rearfoot striking

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Dec 11, 2018.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    Foot arch deformation and plantar fascia loading during running with rearfoot strike and forefoot strike: a dynamic finite element analysis
    TonyLin-Wei ChenaDuoWai-Chi WongabYanWangabJinLincMingZhangba
    Journal of Biomechanics; 8 December 2018
     
  2. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    In my opinion you cannot produce a valid finite element analysis , concerning the foot , if you do not factor in the " initial windlass phase of gait " .

    Which just about makes every such analysis done to date , invalid .

    Also , since the initial windlass phase of gait helps control the rate of load of the plantar fascia , it also likely affects the rate of load on the achilles tendon .
     
  3. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Ultrasound elastographic assessment of plantar fascia in runners using rearfoot strike and forefoot strike
    Tony Lin-WeiChenabCristine E.AgrestabDavid B.LippscdSeraphina G.ProvenzanobJocelyn F.HaferbDuo Wai-ChiWongafMingZhangfaRonald F.Zernickebde
    Journal of Biomechanics; 13 April 2019
     
  4. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    From the above it can be inferred that maneuvers that are performed on the ball of the foot , such as "lean and accelerate " put a lot of strain on the plantar fascia . If you add in direction change ,which will stress certain parts of the foot more than linear running , and you can see why the intrinsics are important in athletic sports .

    Also , the force attenuating characteristics of initial windlass phase are likely more important in sprinting than other types of gait . However , if it has been suppressed by footwear since early childhood , then perhaps the initial windlass phase might be almost absent .

    Here is a video (below) of a foot , which shows almost no evidence of the initial windlass phase .

    The video is from Kevin's ( Dr Kirby) Twitter page .

     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2019
  5. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    Hopefully this is a link to the twitter page of an anatomist called Dr Alana Sharp who is from Liverpool University . The pinned tweet from the 10th of this month shows a video of a foot , very like the video linked to above ,but where the mechanism of the initial windlass phase is clearly demonstrated .
    The foot is apparently Dr Sharp's , I have never met her , but I bet shoe likes to wear sandals !

    https://twitter.com/AlanaCSharp
     
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