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Ski Boot Orthotics and Ski Gait Cycle

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by terigreen, Nov 25, 2020.

  1. terigreen

    terigreen Active Member


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    Ski boot orthotics are used to control the ankle, foot and knee. In the foot, it especially controls the subtalar, midtarsal and ankle joints. If any of these joints are not in their most efficient positions, then the skier will not have the most effective leg power.
    The typical skier’s lower extremities never goes through a complete gait cycle. They ideally should have limited pedal mechanics between midstance and the beginning of propulsion, with slight knee flexion during the entire contact phase. When initiating a turn, a skier will maintain their control by directing the inside knee medially and transferring the load inward to the foot’s medial edge. This is done by internally rotating the tibia, causing a closed kinetic chain pronation of the foot which transfers the pressure through the ski boot on to the ski’s inside edge.
    The higher level skier has a more subtle dynamic and the reverse is true for the beginner. When an snow skier has an over pronated or unstable foot structure, they may have a more difficult time turning as the medial arch of the foot may collapse within the ski boot before the edging force can be transferred.

    Some indications you may need a ski boot orthotic arch support.
    1. Foot and or Ankle pain or fatigue with skiing.
    2. Weak crossovers.
    3. Difficulty making a turn.
    4. Knee and or Low Back pain or fatigue while skiing.
    5. Chronic fatigue or pain directly after skiing.
    A ski boot heat moldable, direct contact orthotic from Atlas Biomechanics achieves all the above goals. It is only 1.3mm thick, fabricated with just a hot water bath, heat gun or toaster oven. Duplicate a lab built custom orthotic in less than 10 minutes.

    Some Benefits of Heat Moldable Orthotics
    *3/4 semi rigid sport orthotic shell.
    *12mm heel cup for added control
    *Medium profile (Sport Orthotic) to fit in most ice skates, gym, and casual shoes.
    *1.3 mm thin. *Completely heat moldable and reheat formable.
    *Proprietary material used to ease of mold.
    *Total custom contact fit.

    Teri Green
    Atlas Biomechanics
     
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