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Take the Mickey Out???

Discussion in 'Break Room' started by Kevin Kirby, Aug 6, 2006.

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    In the thread on "Why Did the Chicken Cross the Road", the statement was made in the opening headline as follows: "Podiatry Arena has its fair share of 'personalities' ... its now time to take the mickey out of some of them."

    Since I haven't ever heard the phrase "take the mickey out of them", I assume it is because this is not an American English phrase but rather a term more common to British English. Can someone please explain this term to me?

    One of the most interesting (and sometimes humorous) aspects of having been able to travel to different countries, all with their own different dialects of English, is to take note of the differences in words for the same object or meaning. Here is a short list of American English versus British English wods/phrases that I have noticed and found to be interesting and sometimes embarrassing. Do any of you have any others for your respective countries?

    American English.........British English

    Windshield.................Windscreen
    Hood........................Bonnet
    Trunk.......................Boot
    Bathroom..................Toilet
    Line.........................Queue
    Drug Store................Chemists
    Gasoline....................Petrol
    French Fries..............Chips
    Eraser......................Rubber
    Rubber.....................Condom
    Fanny Pack...............Bum Bag
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 7, 2006
  2. I'm sure there must be an older version, but in recent years the use of Cockney rhyming slang has become en vogue throughout the UK. Michael Fish was something of a cult figure in broadcasting. He was the longest serving weather presenter on British television, taking up the role in 1974. He came under significant public ridicule in the wake of the Great Storm of 1987; a few hours before the storm broke, on 15 October 1987, he said during a forecast: "Earlier on today, apparently, a woman rang the BBC and said she heard there was a hurricane on the way... well, if you're watching, don't worry, there isn't!".

    That evening, the worst storm to hit Britain's South East since 1703 caused record damages and killed 19 people!

    Unfortunately for Micheal, his surname rhymes with "p!sh" - ever since then "taking the Michael (or Mickey)" became synonymous with ridiculing or poking fun at someone - ergo: taking the Mickey/Michael/Fish/P!sh/P!ss

    Scots *********** English

    Shoogley *********** Unsteady or shaky
    Glaekit *********** Ugly (usually used to describe a person's appearance)
    Simmit ************ Vest
    Gravat ************* Scarf
    Bletherer *********** A chatterbox
    Piece ************* Sandwich
    Drookit ************* Wet or soaked through
    Sonsie ************** Big or impressive
    Mingin ***************** Off-puting smell (usually body odour of a personal nature)
    Lum *************** Chimney (Lang may yer lum reek is a famous wish for newlyweds)
    Scunnered *************** Fed up
    Gyte ************* Angry
    Glaur ************** Mud
    Sprauchlin' ********** Spead about
    Slester ************ A mess
    Skelp ************** A slap or a light punch
    Bairn ************* A child
    Eejit **************** A Rothbart
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2006
  3. Very good, Mark. I assumed it must have named after someone other than the Disney character. ;)
     
  4. admin

    admin Administrator Staff Member

  5. Cameron

    Cameron Well-Known Member

    The phrase derived from jibes made at the expense of Irish people (Micks). When English and Scots gentry returned to the English court in the 16th/17th cneturies many of them had picked up quaint habits from living in Ireland. The hgebnty were put into rule Ireland and replaced the upper crust of the country and this was done to quell the threat of revolt. It also laid the foundation for the troubles that followed. However one annoying habit the gentry brought back was they would go barefoot. This was thought an affront to decency in respectable circles. Many had their portraits painted in bare feet and this became know as "fancy dress".

    When you get the Mickie taken out of you it means you are, Anglified.

    Cameron
     
  6. Heather J Bassett

    Heather J Bassett Well-Known Member

    HI
    suspenders.................braces
    goodbye.....................catchya........hooroo................tata(tatr)
    milkbar.......................deli(delicatessen)
    hello..........................hi.................g'day

    also interesting is the emphasis on the right?? syllable or the
    emprrrrsis on the wrong? syllarrbul

    adeedas...................adidas
    aluminium..................aloominum
    garrrahge....................garij

    tata hj
     
  7. uses of english

    I've come across two linguistic misunderstandings. One was an Australian patient who felt the need to tell me her foot pain was worse when she was wearing thongs. It caused no small amount of embarrassment before she told me that this is oz for flip flops! (for the benifit of our australian readers a thong in the UK means a skimpy knicker!)

    The other was a good friend of mine at university who went home to the bahamas every Christmas. Having gone a bit native he told me he had a very strained week at home when he kept referring to his "Mate Robert". Apparently he had forgotten that over there "mate" was used mainly in the romantic sense. His parents thought he was trying to find a way to tell them he was gay!

    Robert
     
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