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The foot and ACL injury

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Nov 6, 2007.

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  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    Knee Valgus During Drop Jumps in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Female Athletes: The Effect of a Medial Post.
    Joseph M, Tiberio D, Baird JL, Trojian TH, Anderson JM, Kraemer WJ, Maresh CM.
    Am J Sports Med. 2007 Oct 31; [Epub ahead of print]
     
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    Re: Medial posting prevents ACL injury?

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury in female and male athletes: the relationship between foot structure and injury.
    Jenkins WL, Killian CB, Williams DS 3rd, Loudon J, Raedeke SG.
    J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 2007 Sep-Oct;97(5):371-6.
     
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    The Relationship Between the Use of Foot Orthoses and Knee Ligament Injury in Female Collegiate Basketball Players
    Walter L. Jenkins, Susanne G. Raedeke and D.S. Blaise Williams
    Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association; Volume 98 Number 3 207-211 2008
     
  4. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    1
    Arch Height and ACL Injuries

    HEIGHT OF THE FOOT LONGITUDINAL ARCH AND ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURIES
    Paulo César de César, Jairo andré de oliveira alves, João luiz ellera Gomes
    Acta Ortopédica Brasileira
     
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    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

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    1
    Foot Pressure Pattern During Walking in Individuals with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury
    Kaori Sugawara et al
    Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association: May 2016, Vol. 106, No. 3, pp. 201-206
     
  6. NewsBot

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    The effect of foot landing position on biomechanical risk factors associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury.
    Tran AA et al
    J Exp Orthop. 2016 Dec;3(1):13. doi: 10.1186/s40634-016-0049-1
     
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    EFFECT OF ARCH SUPPORT FOOT ORTHOSIS ON LOWER WTREMIN LOADING AND KINEMATICS DURING THE REBOUND
    Zong-Rong Chen, Yu Jung Chen, Hui-Yun Cheng, Chen-Yi Song, Yat-Hon Chen, Hsien-Te Peng
    International Conference of Biomechanics in Sport (2016)
     
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    Evaluation of plantar pressure distributions in patients with anteriorcruciate ligament deficiency: preoperative and postoperative changes.
    Çetin E et al
    Turk J Med Sci. 2017 Apr 18;47(2):587-591. doi: 10.3906/sag-1601-146.
     
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    Running Biomechanics in Individuals with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Systematic Review
    Benoit Pairot-de-FontenayRichard W. WillyAudrey R. C. EliasRyan L. MiznerMarc-Olivier DubéJean-Sébastien Roy
    Sports Medicine: 17 May 2019
     
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    Source
     
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    Lower extremity malalignments associated with ACL injury risks may also be related to decreased field performance
    Yohei Shimokochi et al
    British Journal of Sports Medicine 2020;54:A27.
     
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    Is Foot Type an Indicator of Anterior Cruciate
    Ligament Injury in Football Players?

    K Sinha Vivek et al
    Indian Journal of Youth and Adolescent Health
    Volume 7, Issue 2 - 2020, Pg. No. 16-22

     
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    Press Release:
    Genes play a role in common knee injury
    It has long been known that the choice of shoe, surface and type of sport can all be contributing factors when someone suffers an anterior cruciate ligament rupture. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now observed that genes also play a decisive role.

    By analysing data from the Swedish Twin Register along with data from the Swedish National Patient Register, researchers were able to see how many identical twins and fraternal twins had been diagnosed with anterior cruciate ligament rupture. A total of 88 414 twins aged 17 or above were involved in the epidemiological study, published in the British Journal of Sport Medicine.

    The opportunity to observe injuries among both identical and fraternal twins enables conclusions to be drawn about heredity, explains Karin Magnusson, researcher and expert in twin studies within the field of orthopaedics at Lund University.

    “Identical twins have totally identical genes, while fraternal twins, like other siblings, share half of their genes with each other. We can estimate heritability by studying how often cruciate ligament injury occurs in both twins in a set, that is, we compare the ‘double’ prevalence in identical and fraternal twins. This way we can draw conclusions about the importance of heredity and environment.”

    “Our results show that genes appear to contribute more than we thought. To put it very simply, we can say that out of all cruciate ligament injuries, 69 per cent can be explained by genetics. This should not be interpreted to mean an individual’s risk of suffering the injury is 69 per cent, rather that it is significant in terms of the wider population. Heredity is easier to understand when compared with other illnesses or conditions. The genetic risk of suffering from cancer is 33 per cent, for example. This means that 33 per cent of variation within the population in terms of causes of all cancer cases is due to genetic variation, while the rest is due to other factors – such as environment or lifestyle,” explains Magnusson.

    The genetic risk was equally high in men and women.

    The results may be significant in terms of preventing this type of injury more effectively.

    “In the past, genetic factors have not been taken into account when working to prevent anterior cruciate ligament injury, for example among athletes. This study does not provide us with an answer as to whether heredity entails anatomical or physiological conditions that could affect the risk of a cruciate ligament injury. However, if we know that there are many cases of this injury within a family, then it is worth being extra cautious and doing more preventive training, such as landing after jumping when playing handball, and so on,” says Martin Englund, professor at Lund University, physician at Skåne University Hospital and one of the researchers behind the study.

    The study was conducted thanks to funding from the Swedish Research Council, the Greta and Johan Kock Foundation, the Swedish Rheumatism Foundation, the Österlund Foundation, ALF funding from Region Skåne and the Faculty of Medicine at Lund University.
     
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    Analysis of ground reaction forces and muscle activity in individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction during different running strike patterns
    Amir AliJafarnezhadgero et al
    Gait & Posture; 7 September 2021
     
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    Effect of Rearfoot Strikes on the Hip and Knee Rotational Kinetic Chain During the Early Phase of Cutting in Female Athletes
    Issei Ogasawara, Yohei Shimokochi, Shoji Konda, Tatsuo Mae & Ken Nakata
    Sports Medicine - Open volume 7, Article number: 75 (2021)
     
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    Altered lower extremity biomechanics following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction during single-leg and double-leg stop-jump tasks: A bilateral total support moment analysis
    Willa Ma et al
    November 20, 2021
     
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