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The importance of the venous foot pump

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by scotfoot, Feb 13, 2019 at 3:58 PM.

  1. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member


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    It has been long been understood that the venous foot pump and the calf muscle pump are present to counter the effects of gravity and assist with the return of venous blood to the heart .

    However , it now seems , however incredible it may sound , that although the motion of the legs during gait clearly generate considerable centrifugal forces which would hinder venous return , no study has ever been made of these forces .

    In light of this , it is entirely possible that the venous foot pump and the calf muscle pump are far more important than previously realised .

    Astonishing . Just jaw dropping if true .

    Gerry
     
  2. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    Further to the above , there is some evidence that the functioning of the calf pump can be improved with exercise , but it does not look as if similar evidence has been sought for foot pump function .
     
  3. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    Note ;In post 1 " centrifugal forces" should read " centrifugal effects "
     
  4. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    If you start to consider the centrifugal effect on venous return , then perhaps it might be easier to better help with venous reflux during gait .

    For example , if centrifugal effects are greatest as the foot rapidly decelerates during heel strike ,then might it be possible to design a garment ,or accelerometer triggered device , that will exert external pressure on the calf at the exact point in the gait cycle when reflux past incompetent venous valves is likely to occur ? This applied external pressure may need to be of only very short duration .

    That is just an unexplored idea of course but you can see how realizing the importance of the the centrifugal effect on venous return changes ones focus .


    Here is a link to a thread on this subject on a site called Biomch-l

    Centripedal forces and the calf muscle pump - Biomch-L


    https://biomch-l.isbweb.org/.../31986-Centripedal-forces-and-the-calf-muscle-pump

    7 Feb 2019 - However what about the centripedal forces and centrifugal effect ... but none replicate the additional centripetal forces encountered during gait .
     
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