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Weightlifting squat: barefoot or shoes?

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Sep 14, 2013.

  1. Brian A. Rothbart

    Brian A. Rothbart Active Member

    The goal of any weight lifter is to function with linear mechanics. Torsional mechanics leads to overuse injuries and dramatically decreases performance.
    The major cause of torsional mechanics is gravity drive pronation. Isolate the etiology of gravity drive pronation and attenuate/eliminate it, will (1) decrease the propensity of overuse injuries and (2) dramatically increase performance.
    Comments?
     
  2. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    So foot muscle strengthening then . I may be as guilty of spamming as you .
     
  3. Brian A. Rothbart

    Brian A. Rothbart Active Member

    Just an interesting anecdotal incident at Gold's Gym in St Petersburg Florida some years ago:

    I was presenting a workshop for some 30 aspiring weight lifters at the Gym, discussing the concept of linear vs torsional mechanics: how torsional mechanics compromised performance

    One weight lifter volunteered to be a test case:
    • His best ever squat lift was 500 lbs.
    • He proceeded to squat lift 485 lbs.
    • Upon examination I diagnosed the PreClinical Clubfoot Deformity and concomitant gravity drive pronation (he functioned in extreme gravity drive pronation).
    • I placed the appropriate Proprioceptive Insole inside his (new) shoes
    • He proceeded to squat lift 540 lbs
    • Removed the Proprioceptive Insoles, his squat lift fell to 485 lbs
    This test was then repeated with 7 other lifters with the same results: decreasing the torsional mechanics resulting in increasing their lb performance.

    Not definitive but certainly compelling.
     
  4. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    So one size fits all ?
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    Effect of footwear on the biomechanics of loaded back squats to volitional exhaustion in skilled lifters.
    Brice, SM, Doma, K, and Spratford, W.
    J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2021
     
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