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Specialized Training in Young Athletes Linked to Serious Overuse Injuries

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Apr 19, 2013.

  1. NewsBot

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    Press Release:
    Intense, Specialized Training in Young Athletes Linked to Serious Overuse Injuries
     
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    OVERUSE AND TRAUMATIC MUSCULOSKELETAL EXTREMITY INJURIES IN SCHOOL CHILDREN
    E Jespersen, R Holst, C Franz, C Rexen, H Klakk, N Wedderkopp
    Br J Sports Med 2014;48:611-612 doi:10.1136/bjsports-2014-093494.140
    Abstracts from the IOC World Conference on Prevention of Injury & Illness in Sport, Monaco 2014

     
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    Association between sports type and overuse injuries of extremities in children and adolescents: a systematic review.
    Chéron C, Le Scanff C, Leboeuf-Yde C
    Chiropr Man Therap. 2016 Nov 15;24:41. eCollection 2016.
     
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    Press Release:
    Overuse Injuries More Common in Kids Who Specialize in Individual Sport
    4/12/2017 12:00 AM
     
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    A Prospective Study on the Effect of Sport Specialization on Lower Extremity Injury Rates in High School Athletes
    Timothy A. McGuine, PhD, ATC, Eric G. Post, MS, Scott J. Hetzel, MS, ...
    The American Journal of Sports Medicine; July 23, 2017
     
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    Press Release:
    Sports Specialization May Lead to More Lower Extremity Injuries
    Better education to coaches and parents about the effects of single sport specialization is critical, say researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada. Research Wins AOSSM/STOP Sports Injuries Annual Award
    TORONTO, ONTARIO, CANADA (PRWEB) JULY 23, 2017
    Better education to coaches and parents about the effects of single sport specialization is critical, say researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’ s Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada.
    “Our study is the first one to prospectively document the association between sports specialization and lower extremity injuries in a large, diverse, group of high school athletes,” said lead researcher, Timothy A. McGuine, PhD, ATC from the University of Wisconsin.
    McGuine and his colleagues enrolled 1,544 individuals into the study during the 2015-2016 school year with 50% being female and an average age of 16 years. Participants completed a questionnaire which identified their sports participation, history of injury and level of specialization (low, moderate, high) based on a 3-item scale previously published. They were asked to report all interscholastic and club sports participation during the previous 12 months and any activity that they planned to participate in during the upcoming school year. The questionnaires were also reviewed by an athletic trainer before being placed into the study.
    The participants competed in 167,349 athletic exposures. A total of 490 (31.7%) reported sustaining a previous loss of practice/playing time due to a lower extremity injury (LEI) while 759 (49.2%) participated in their primary sport in a league outside of their high school. During the study time-period, 15% or 235 individuals sustained 276 lower extremity injuries causing them to miss an average of seven days of participation. Injuries occurred most often in the ankle (34%), knee (25%) and upper leg (13%) and included ligament sprains (41%), muscle/tendon strains (25%) and tendonitis/tenosynovitis (20%). Soccer was the sport with the highest percentage of athletes being highly specialized with 265 subjects reporting that they had competed in more than 60 competitions within the last year in their primary sport. Players whose primary sports were basketball, football and soccer sustained more lower extremity injuries than their peers who were in baseball, tennis, track, volleyball or wrestling.
    “Our results demonstrated that athletes who classified themselves as moderately specialized had a 50% higher incidence of LEI and athletes who had a high specialization classification had an 85% higher incidence of LEI,” said McGuine. “Sport specialization appears to be an independent risk factor for injury, as opposed to simply being a function of increased sport exposure. Athletic associations, school administrators, coaches and sports medicine providers need to better educate parents and their athletes on the increased chances of injury risk and provide more opportunities for diversified athletic play.”
     
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    Press Release:
    High risk of injury in young elite athletes
    Published 2017-10-18 08:00.

    Every week, an average of three in every ten adolescent elite athletes suffer an injury. Worst affected are young women, and the risk of injury increases with low self-esteem, especially in combination with less sleep and higher training volume and intensity, a doctoral thesis from Karolinska Institutet shows.
    Even though thousands of young elite athletes participate in organised sporting events every year, knowledge of injury and its consequences is limited. A thesis by Philip von Rosen, researcher at the Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, can help to address this problem.
    Some 1,200 young people in Sweden attend a national sports high school, where they combine their regular studies with elite sports in order to attain an international standard in their particular activity. Philip von Rosen’s studies include 680 elite athletes representing 16 different sports at 24 such schools around the country who have completed a series of surveys on injury occurrence and the volume and intensity of their training programmes.
    75 per cent were seriously injured over a year
    “Our studies show that the incidence of injury is high in adolescent elite athletes,” says Mr Philip von Rosen. “During the average week, one in three of them was injured. Over a year, almost all of them had been injured at least once and around 75 per cent reported that they had been seriously injured at least once during the year.”
    Girls had highest rate of injury and remained injured for longer.
    To ascertain the possible risk factors behind the injuries, the participants were also asked every term about their self-esteem, nutrient intake and self-rated stress and sleep. The ones who increased the volume and intensity of their training while reducing the duration of their sleep showed a 100 per cent rise in risk of injury. Low self-esteem also increased the risk. An athlete with low self-esteem who increased the volume and intensity of his or her training while cutting back on sleep had three times the risk of injury compared to an athlete with average self-esteem who had not changed his or her training or sleeping habit.
    Negative psychological consequences
    In smaller research groups, students also talked about negative psychological consequences of injury, such as guilt, frustration and anger, and how injuries made them consider quitting elite sport altogether.
    “The high risk of injury in adolescent elite athletes shows that early-intervention injury-prevention strategies are needed in order to avoid long-term consequences of injury and to encourage continuing engagement in sport,” says Mr von Rosen. “We therefore recommend that medical teams are made available for all athletes at every national sports high school to reduce the unhealthy behaviour associated with being injured, to prevent new injuries and to help injured athletes return to sport.”
    Mr von Rosen will be defending his thesis “Injuries, risk factors, consequences and injury perceptions in adolescent elite athletes” at Karolinska Institutet on 20
     
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    Prevalence and incidence of musculoskeletal extremity complaints in children and adolescents. A systematic review.
    Fuglkjær S et al
    BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2017 Oct 18;18(1):418. doi: 10.1186/s12891-017-1771-2.
     
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