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The functional importance of human foot muscles for bipedal locomotion

Discussion in 'Biomechanics, Sports and Foot orthoses' started by NewsBot, Jan 18, 2019.

  1. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1

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    The functional importance of human foot muscles for bipedal locomotion
    Dominic James Farris, Luke A. Kelly, Andrew G. Cresswell, and Glen A. Lichtwark
    PNAS January 17, 2019
     
  2. Admin2

    Admin2 Administrator Staff Member

  3. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    Apparently the group who produced the paper mentioned in the first post have another coming out next week . I hope its related to the intrinsics and balance .

    Some time ago I advanced a grounded theory about the role of the intrinsics in balance (see below ) .

    It would be fascinating to see if the theory is still plausible following nerve block scrutiny .

    Any chance of a hint Luke ?


    Intrinsic foot muscles .The heart of balance - Biomch-L


    https://biomch-l.isbweb.org/threads/30914-Intrinsic-foot-muscles-The-heart-of-balance
    17 Jan 2018 - Intrinsic foot muscles .The heart of balance ? I recently placed a number of posts on a different part of the site under an Evolutionary heading ...
     
  4. scotfoot

    scotfoot Well-Known Member

    So the new paper is out and its not about nerve blocks and balance (see 2 below ) .This is a bit disappointing but the new paper is still of interest ,not least for the following quote -

    "We found that the underlying passive visco-elasticity of the foot is modulated by the muscles of the foot, facilitating both dissipation and generation of energy depending on the mechanical requirements at the centre of mass (COM). "

    In my opinion , although the researchers might not agree ,we are getting closer and closer to the idea of the tissues that lie between the bony arch of the foot and the plantar fascia ,being compressed during gait .The visco-elasticity of the muscular component of this tissue can be controlled by muscle contraction . There is no reason why muscle cannot act as a skeletal component . For example , the muscular hydrostat .

    The mechanism is explained here (1)-
    Plantar venous plexus and the intrinsic muscles of the foot ...




    (2)
    The foot is more than a spring: human foot muscles perform work to ...


    https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsif.2018.0680
    2 days ago - The foot is more than a spring: human foot muscles perform work to adapt to theenergetic requirements of locomotion. Ryan Riddick; ,; Dominic ...
     
  5. NewsBot

    NewsBot The Admin that posts the news.

    Articles:
    1
    The foot is more than a spring: human foot muscles perform work to adapt to the energetic requirements of locomotion
    Ryan Riddick , Dominic J. Farris and Luke A. Kelly
    JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY INTERFACE:23 January 2019
     
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